Vol 3, Issue 15

The Drought is Over in Texas

For the first time in more than five years, Texas no longer is in a drought. While less than 3 percent of the state remains “abnormally dry,” according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, drought has disappeared from every other part of Texas.

Sheila Olmstead is an environmental economist at UT-Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs.
Sheila Olmstead is an environmental economist at UT-Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs.

The Q&A: Sheila Olmstead

In this week's Q&A, we interview Sheila Olmstead, an environmental economist and associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs.

A view downstream from the headwaters of the San Marcos River. Water from the Edwards Aquifer flows from San Marcos Springs into the San Marcos River.
A view downstream from the headwaters of the San Marcos River. Water from the Edwards Aquifer flows from San Marcos Springs into the San Marcos River.

Study Shows Results of Depleting Aquifers

A University of Illinois study examined the impact of depleting three major U.S. aquifers, finding that the aquifers' draining could lead to food insecurity and water shortages in cities.

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