Vol 3, Issue 17

El Cenizo and its neighboring border town of Rio Bravo in South Texas have a brand-new water treatment plant that was supposed to provide nearly 10,000 people here with clean drinking water. But it’s never been run properly, critics say.
El Cenizo and its neighboring border town of Rio Bravo in South Texas have a brand-new water treatment plant that was supposed to provide nearly 10,000 people here with clean drinking water. But it’s never been run properly, critics say.

Defendant Pleads Guilty in Webb County Water Trial

On the fourth day of a criminal trial involving undrinkable water in two border communities, one of the two defendants pleaded guilty to all charges against him.

 

Water enters another phase of treatment inside the Rio Bravo treatment plant, which was finished in 2006 with $12 million in state funds.
Water enters another phase of treatment inside the Rio Bravo treatment plant, which was finished in 2006 with $12 million in state funds.

State's Role in Unhealthy Water Probed

State environmental regulators should have done more to protect the safety of drinking water for two small border communities in Webb County, defense lawyers argued Thursday in the criminal trial for two former water treatment plant employees.

Water treatment facility in Rio Bravo, Texas.
Water treatment facility in Rio Bravo, Texas.

Trial Begins Over Undrinkable Water in Webb County

The blame game over who's responsible for the problems 8,000 border residents have with their drinking water is playing out in a Laredo court, as Webb County water treatment plant workers face charges of falsifying records to hide contamination from state regulators. 

Workers cut open bags of WaterSavr, an evaporation suppressant, to apply the powder to Lake Arrowhead. WaterSavr's manufacturers claim it will save 30 percent of water that would have otherwise evaporated from the reservoir.
Workers cut open bags of WaterSavr, an evaporation suppressant, to apply the powder to Lake Arrowhead. WaterSavr's manufacturers claim it will save 30 percent of water that would have otherwise evaporated from the reservoir.

Los Angeles Uses Shade Balls to Conserve Reservoir Water

Black plastic spheres known as shade balls are being deployed in four Los Angeles reservoirs as part of a $34 million project to protect the regional water supply from evaporation as well as contamination.

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