Members of various faith communities met at the Texas Capitol on Aug. 1 to speak out against the "bathroom bill." 
 
<div class="markdown-html style-scope ps-metadata-impl"> <p class="style-scope ps-metadata-impl">Members of various faith communities met at the Texas Capitol on Aug. 1 to speak out against the "bathroom bill."&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div>

After months of controversy, Texas bathroom bill dies quietly

After generating a heated statewide debate earlier this year, the Texas bathroom bill died in the special legislative session with little drama or fanfare. Its supporters are urging the governor to call another special session in hopes of reviving it.

 
Public Works Director Doug Hutcheson fills a cup with water at the water treatment plant in Wolfforth, Texas. &ldquo;We've tried to comply. We're team players. We're wanting to fix it and get it on down the road,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp;
<p>Public Works Director Doug Hutcheson fills a cup with water at the water treatment plant in Wolfforth, Texas. &ldquo;We've tried to comply. We're team players. We're wanting to fix it and get it on down the road,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp;</p>

Millions consumed potentially unsafe water in the past 10 years

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Texas, Oklahoma and California were the top states for EPA drinking water quality violations during the past decade.

 

Millions consumed potentially unsafe water in the past 10 years

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Public Works Director Doug Hutcheson fills a cup with water at the water treatment plant in Wolfforth, Texas. &ldquo;We've tried to comply. We're team players. We're wanting to fix it and get it on down the road,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp;
<p>Public Works Director Doug Hutcheson fills a cup with water at the water treatment plant in Wolfforth, Texas. &ldquo;We've tried to comply. We're team players. We're wanting to fix it and get it on down the road,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp;</p>

Texas, Oklahoma and California were the top states for EPA drinking water quality violations during the past decade.

 

 

Texplainer: Can Texas A&M officials cancel a white nationalist rally?

White nationalist Richard Spencer speaks at Texas A&M University in College Station while Preston Wiginton, who privately arranged the event, listens, on December 6, 2016.
White nationalist Richard Spencer speaks at Texas A&M University in College Station while Preston Wiginton, who privately arranged the event, listens, on December 6, 2016.

If Texas A&M gets sued over canceling a "White Lives Matter" rally, it might be able to defend itself in court by proving the event posed a public safety risk and would have disrupted normal campus activities. 

With two days left in special session, comptroller finds extra $196 million

State Comptroller Glenn Hegar presents the Biennial Revenue Estimate to waiting legislators, state officials and the press on January 9, 2017.  Hegar predicts a tight budget with falling revenue from Texas oil and gas production and sales taxes.
State Comptroller Glenn Hegar presents the Biennial Revenue Estimate to waiting legislators, state officials and the press on January 9, 2017. Hegar predicts a tight budget with falling revenue from Texas oil and gas production and sales taxes.

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar on Tuesday delivered some welcome news to weary state lawmakers: Their coffers should be richer than he previously anticipated.

 

After Charlottesville, unrest over Texas' Confederate statues is renewed

Most signs on Robert E. Lee Road in South Austin were spray painted over&nbsp;Monday&nbsp;morning following the deadly gathering of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia.
<p><span>Most signs on Robert E. Lee Road in South Austin were spray painted over&nbsp;</span><span class="aBn" data-term="goog_1917369845"><span class="aQJ">Monday</span></span><span>&nbsp;morning following the deadly gathering of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia.</span></p>

The spark that started the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday — unrest over Confederate monuments — has been reignited here in Texas. Here's a look at what cities are considering.  

Video: Our TribCast team tackles the special session

The day before the end of the special legislative session, the Tribune's Emily Ramshaw, Evan Smith, Ross Ramsey and Patrick Svitek talk to state Reps. Nicole Collier and Kevin Roberts about what got finished — and what didn't. 

Analysis: It’s never the ending that you expect

Texas House members huddled near the dais on Aug. 15, 2017. The House adjourned sine die one day before the Legislature's special session would have been forced to conclude.
<p>Texas House members huddled near the dais on Aug. 15, 2017. The House adjourned sine die one day before the Legislature's special session would have been forced to conclude.</p>

The Texas Legislature's special session ended with a bang, but it wasn't the sound of the property tax bill the governor was hoping for. Will he call state lawmakers back for more?

House Republicans to caucus on speaker rules

Speaker Straus hits the gavel as members vote no on an amendment on Senate Bill 1, the property tax bill, on August 12, 2017.
<p>Speaker Straus hits the gavel as members vote no on an amendment on Senate Bill 1, the property tax bill, on August 12, 2017.</p>

Texas House Republicans will meet early Wednesday to discuss whether to require members of their caucus to choose a speaker candidate — then stand behind their pick when the vote goes to the full House in January 2019.

 

Sine die is nigh (podcast)

The Tribune's Emily Ramshaw, Evan Smith, Ross Ramsey and Patrick Svitek discuss the end of the special session during a Live TribCast at the Austin Club on August 15, 2017.
<p>The Tribune's Emily Ramshaw, Evan Smith, Ross Ramsey and Patrick Svitek discuss the end of the special session during a Live TribCast at the Austin Club on August 15, 2017.</p>

In a special live TribCast the day before the end of the special legislative session, Emily talks to Evan, Ross, Patrick and state Reps. Nicole Collier and Kevin Roberts about what lawmakers accomplished, who the winners and losers are, and the tension around a white nationalist event initially planned for College Station. 

 

Special session coming down to school finance, property taxes

After a one-hour evening recess, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick gavels in the Senate to consider the committee substitute to House BIll 21, the school finance bill on Aug. 14, 2017. &nbsp; Patrick and Sen. Larry Taylor had earlier met with Gov. Greg Abbott during the pause in proceedings.&nbsp;
<p>After a one-hour evening recess, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick gavels in the Senate to consider the committee substitute to House BIll 21, the school finance bill on Aug. 14, 2017. &nbsp; Patrick and Sen. Larry Taylor had earlier met with Gov. Greg Abbott during the pause in proceedings.&nbsp;</p>

House and Senate negotiators will have the next two days remaining in the current special legislative session to hammer out their differences on legislation tackling property taxes, school finance and other items still in play.