This graphic humorously references a trip that top state liquor regulators took to the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in 2015 at a cost of more than $7,000 in taxpayer money. The illustration was created by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission during work hours on a state computer with input from top agency officials, records show. Pictured from left to right are TABC Director Sherry Cook, Licensing Director Amy Harrison, Analyst Jesse Valdez and then-TABC technology contractor Jim Harrison.  
<p><span>This graphic humorously references a trip that top state liquor regulators took to the National Conference of State Liquor Administrators in 2015 at a cost of more than $7,000 in taxpayer money. The illustration was created by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission during work hours on a state computer with input from top agency officials, records show. Pictured from left to right are TABC Director Sherry Cook, Licensing Director Amy Harrison, Analyst Jesse Valdez and then-TABC technology contractor Jim Harrison. &nbsp;</span></p>

Liquor regulators partying on taxpayers' tab

Texas alcohol regulators know how to party: records show they've spent tens of thousands of dollars to travel to swanky resorts where liquor flows and industry lobbyists abound. Now the state's top liquor administrator says she may have to disclose more about the money she's received from an industry-funded group.

 
Road crews are prolific in the Midland region following the recent oil boom, when heavy truck traffic obliterated highways.
Road crews are prolific in the Midland region following the recent oil boom, when heavy truck traffic obliterated highways.

Analysis: Is this Texas state budget trick constitutional?

The Texas Senate is proposing a new accounting trick to balance its 2018-19 budget. The contrivance would work, mathematically speaking, but it raises constitutional questions and faces derision from the House.

Analysis: Is this Texas state budget trick constitutional?

Road crews are prolific in the Midland region following the recent oil boom, when heavy truck traffic obliterated highways.
Road crews are prolific in the Midland region following the recent oil boom, when heavy truck traffic obliterated highways.

The Texas Senate is proposing a new accounting trick to balance its 2018-19 budget. The contrivance would work, mathematically speaking, but it raises constitutional questions and faces derision from the House.

 

Instead of a border wall, some Texans want parks, solar panels or levees

A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office.
A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office.

As the Trump Administration moves ahead with its plans for a barrier just north of the Rio Grande, Texans are weighing in on how the president should approach the project. And the ideas range from the comical to the practical.

Former Gov. Perry questions Texas A&M student body election

Former Gov. Perry is sworn in before testifying at a Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on his nomination to be Energy secretary on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on January 19, 2017.
Former Gov. Perry is sworn in before testifying at a Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on his nomination to be Energy secretary on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on January 19, 2017.

Former Gov. Rick Perry, now the U.S. energy secretary, is questioning the legitimacy of the election that gave his alma mater its first openly gay student body president.