Secretary of Energy Rick Perry testifies at a Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing in Washington, D.C. on Oct 12, 2017.
<p>Secretary of Energy Rick Perry testifies at a Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing in Washington, D.C. on Oct 12, 2017.</p>

Perry pursuing policy on coal, nuclear power at odds with Texas record

As multiple Texas coal plants wind down operations, U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry is pushing a widely decried proposal to subsidize coal and nuclear plants in the name of grid resiliency. Some see the move as a significant shift in his views on regulation since his days as governor.

 
Myles Broussard tosses pieces of drywall into a pile of trash and storm debris outside his home in Beaumont, Texas on Sept. 4, 2017.&nbsp;
<p><span>Myles Broussard tosses pieces of drywall into a pile of trash and storm debris outside his home in Beaumont, Texas on Sept. 4, 2017.&nbsp;</span></p>

Texas attorney general opens investigation into Harvey debris removal companies

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has opened an investigation into debris removal companies who may be “overpromising and underdelivering” their post-Harvey cleanup services.

 

Jeremy Boutor at his flood-damaged rental home in one of the neighborhoods flooded in Addicks Reservoir in Houston on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.&nbsp;
<p><span>Jeremy Boutor at his flood-damaged rental home in one of the neighborhoods flooded in Addicks Reservoir in Houston on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.&nbsp;</span></p>

Federal housing agency announces $57.8 million to Texas for Harvey recovery

Federal housing officials announced Friday what they called “another down payment” of $57.8 million to support long-term recovery efforts from Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

U.S. Attorney&nbsp;General Jeff&nbsp;Sessions&nbsp;speaks about&nbsp;carrying out President Donald Trump's immigration priorities at the&nbsp;U.S. Attorney&rsquo;s Office for the Western&nbsp;District of Texas in&nbsp;Austin on&nbsp;Friday, Oct. 20, 2017.&nbsp;
<p>U.S. Attorney&nbsp;General Jeff&nbsp;Sessions&nbsp;speaks about&nbsp;carrying out President Donald Trump's immigration priorities at the&nbsp;U.S. Attorney&rsquo;s Office for the Western&nbsp;District of Texas in&nbsp;Austin on&nbsp;<span data-term="goog_2092899666">Friday, Oct. 20, 2017.</span>&nbsp;</p>

In Austin, Sessions touts Trump's hardline stance on immigration

“The President is determined, first and finally, to build a wall at the border,” Sessions said during a 20-minute speech in downtown Austin in which he praised state Republicans who approved an anti-"sanctuary" law earlier this year.

Texas attorney general opens investigation into Harvey debris removal companies

Myles Broussard tosses pieces of drywall into a pile of trash and storm debris outside his home in Beaumont, Texas on Sept. 4, 2017.&nbsp;
<p><span>Myles Broussard tosses pieces of drywall into a pile of trash and storm debris outside his home in Beaumont, Texas on Sept. 4, 2017.&nbsp;</span></p>

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has opened an investigation into debris removal companies who may be “overpromising and underdelivering” their post-Harvey cleanup services.

 

Federal housing agency announces $57.8 million to Texas for Harvey recovery

Jeremy Boutor at his flood-damaged rental home in one of the neighborhoods flooded in Addicks Reservoir in Houston on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.&nbsp;
<p><span>Jeremy Boutor at his flood-damaged rental home in one of the neighborhoods flooded in Addicks Reservoir in Houston on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.&nbsp;</span></p>

Federal housing officials announced Friday what they called “another down payment” of $57.8 million to support long-term recovery efforts from Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

In Austin, Sessions touts Trump's hardline stance on immigration

U.S. Attorney&nbsp;General Jeff&nbsp;Sessions&nbsp;speaks about&nbsp;carrying out President Donald Trump's immigration priorities at the&nbsp;U.S. Attorney&rsquo;s Office for the Western&nbsp;District of Texas in&nbsp;Austin on&nbsp;Friday, Oct. 20, 2017.&nbsp;
<p>U.S. Attorney&nbsp;General Jeff&nbsp;Sessions&nbsp;speaks about&nbsp;carrying out President Donald Trump's immigration priorities at the&nbsp;U.S. Attorney&rsquo;s Office for the Western&nbsp;District of Texas in&nbsp;Austin on&nbsp;<span data-term="goog_2092899666">Friday, Oct. 20, 2017.</span>&nbsp;</p>

“The President is determined, first and finally, to build a wall at the border,” Sessions said during a 20-minute speech in downtown Austin in which he praised state Republicans who approved an anti-"sanctuary" law earlier this year.

 

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Hell and High Water: How Houston is ill-prepared for a hurricane

Federal appeals court to consider blocking undocumented teen's scheduled abortion

A small opening at the base of the border fence in Brownsville is meant to let small, endangered wild cats like the ocelot through. The “cat holes,” which are the size of a piece of printer paper, appear every 500 feet or so.
A small opening at the base of the border fence in Brownsville is meant to let small, endangered wild cats like the ocelot through. The “cat holes,” which are the size of a piece of printer paper, appear every 500 feet or so.

Whether an undocumented Texas teen can get a scheduled abortion Friday remains up in the air ahead of a court hearing before the U.S. Court of Appeals.

The Brief: Texans focused on cleanup, housing and health in wake of Harvey

One of three approved debris removal sites in Port Arthur, where some residents have raised concerns about the city&rsquo;s plans for post-Harvey clean up. "It&rsquo;s just not right,&rdquo; said Tami Pinkney, who lives in a home across the street from one of the sites. &ldquo;This is not safe. It&rsquo;s just not safe.&rdquo;
<p><span id="docs-internal-guid-74fde164-bfe4-525c-5e4f-81113fbbc11f"><span>One of three approved debris removal sites in Port Arthur, where some residents have raised concerns about the city&rsquo;s plans for post-Harvey clean up. "It&rsquo;s just not right,&rdquo; said Tami Pinkney, who lives in a home across the street from one of the sites. &ldquo;This is not safe. It&rsquo;s just not safe.&rdquo;</span></span></p>

Texas voters are pretty content with how all levels of government responded to Hurricane Harvey, per the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll.

A $10,000 degree that freshmen are discouraged from pursuing

Lavelle Hendricks, a professor at Texas A&amp;M University-Commerce, teaches a "signature course" on mental health, drugs and alcohol to a class of freshmen. University officials have reimagined the first-year experience at A&amp;M-Commerce, and each freshman is required to take at least one signature course.&nbsp;
<p>Lavelle Hendricks, a professor at Texas A&amp;M University-Commerce, teaches a "signature course" on mental health, drugs and alcohol to a class of freshmen. University officials have reimagined the first-year experience at A&amp;M-Commerce, and each freshman is required to take at least one signature course.&nbsp;</p>

At the urging of Gov. Rick Perry, Texas A&M University-Commerce developed an online degree program that can be completed for less than $10,000. So why doesn't it want its freshmen to sign up?

Cornyn: Trump assured me more Harvey aid for Texas coming in November

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn speaks at the Texas State Rifle Association general meeting in Round Rock on Feb. 25, 2017.
<p>U.S. Sen. John Cornyn speaks at the Texas State Rifle Association general meeting in Round Rock on Feb. 25, 2017.</p>

Many Texas officials were disappointed with the details of a disaster aid bill currently moving through Congress. Rather than changing the bill in the Senate, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn said a follow-up bill in November will do more for the state.

Parents push for Texas to screen all newborns for spinal muscular atrophy

Beth Moore plays with two of her children, William, 6, and Mary, 2, who both have spinal muscular atrophy. Moore asked the Newborn Screening Advisory Committee in August to add the disease to a list of diseases for which newborns are automatically screened in Texas.
<p><span>Beth Moore plays with two of her children, William, 6, and Mary, 2, who both have spinal muscular atrophy. Moore asked the Newborn Screening Advisory Committee in August to add the disease to a list of diseases for which newborns are automatically screened in Texas.</span></p>

A group of parents is asking the state to test all babies for spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant death. They hope that a treatment newly approved by the FDA will bolster their cause.