Ethics Explorer A Guide to the Financial Interests of Elected Officials

U.S. Rep. Blake Farenthold (R)

Industry
Consultant, Lawyer, Broadcasting
Education
B.A. Radio, Television, Film, University of Texas at Austin. L.L.C. St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio
Spouse
Debbie
Committees
Not yet assigned
Financial Statements

Sources of Income

  • Farenthold was elected to Congress in 2010, defeating longtime Democratic incumbent Solomon Ortiz

  • Farenthold has worked as a conservative radio commentator, practiced law with the Kleberg Law Firm and founded Farenthold Consulting LLC, a computer consulting and web design firm. He received income from Farenthold Consulting in 2011. 

  • Farenthold receives a number of royalty payments every year from investments in oil companies throughout Texas. The value of the assets range from $1,001 to $50,000 and yearly payments can reach up to $15,000. He receives payments from a real estate property, where his investments range from $5,000 to $15,000. Farenthold also receives money from family estates. He received $17,609 from the Abmit Management Trust in 2011. 

Property

  • Jointly owns a residential vacation home in Mexico with his sister, valued at between $250,000 and $500,000

  • Owns a condominium in Lubbock valued at between $100,000 and $250,000

  • Owns a home in Corpus Christi valued at $1.5 million 

  • Owns a condo in Washington, D.C., valued at between $100,000 and $250,000

Analysis

  • Farenthold's top contributors in the last election cycle were the Freedom Project, United Technologies, Honeywell International and Koch Industries. 

  • Farenthold was one of the richest House members in 2011, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, with a calculated wealth of $35.8 million

  • Farenthold has many oil investments in Texas and has supported some legislation favoring the oil and gas industry in Congress. He co-sponsored a bill that would have allowed ethanol produced from natural gas to be classified as a renewable fuel, enabling it to compete with other forms of ethanol. And he joined dozens of members of Congress in urging U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to expand liquid natural gas exportation.