Ross Ramsey Executive Editor

Ross Ramsey is executive editor and co-founder of The Texas Tribune. Before joining the Tribune, Ross was editor and co-owner of Texas Weekly for 15 years. He did a 28-month stint in government as associate deputy comptroller for policy and director of communications with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Before that, he reported for the Houston Chronicle from its Austin bureau and for the Dallas Times Herald, first on the business desk in Dallas and later as its Austin bureau chief, and worked as a Dallas-based freelance business writer, writing for regional and national magazines and newspapers. Ross got his start in journalism in broadcasting, covering news for radio stations in Denton and Dallas.

Recent Contributions

Analysis: That Silly Perry Vs. Cruz Idea? Don’t Be So Quick to Dismiss It

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, Gov. Rick Perry and state Rep. Jimmie Don Aycock, R-Killeen, are shown at a press conference at Fort Hood, Texas, on April 4, 2014.
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, Gov. Rick Perry and state Rep. Jimmie Don Aycock, R-Killeen, are shown at a press conference at Fort Hood, Texas, on April 4, 2014.

Ted Cruz and Rick Perry are well known across Texas, able to raise money inside and outside of the state, and demonstrably ambitious. The speculation about a 2018 matchup will probably come to nothing, right?

Analysis: Hiding Texas Campaign Spending Details, Legally

The Texas Ethics Commission is considering rules that would require political consultants to report their spending in the same way that candidates are required to do.
The Texas Ethics Commission is considering rules that would require political consultants to report their spending in the same way that candidates are required to do.

The state is trying to regulate what some have called the “campaign in a box,” when a candidate reports writing one big check to a consultant, who then handles all of the campaign spending off the books.

Analysis: Donald Trump’s Trickle-Down Effect on Texas Politics

From left: Texas Agriculture Sid Miller, 2016 Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush.
From left: Texas Agriculture Sid Miller, 2016 Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush.

Donald Trump and everyone’s reaction to him might turn out to be unimportant in the next couple of election cycles. If the Republican wins the presidency, he’ll be a factor in the 2018 mid-term elections. If he doesn’t, he’ll be a memory.

Analysis: A Temporary Hitch in Plans for Some of Texas’ Political A-List

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro (left), U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Joaquín Castro, D-San Antonio.
U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro (left), U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and U.S. Rep. Joaquín Castro, D-San Antonio.

A couple of rising stars in Texas — Ted Cruz and Julián Castro — have left their predictable political orbits for uncharted journeys. Although you’ll hear otherwise, it’s silly to say they’ll never get up. Time is on their side.