One Question Remains

What do you say about this governor's race? That the trailer was better than the movie? That sometimes a Super Bowl featuring the two best teams in the league turns into a blowout? That Texans who vote with their middle fingers differentiate between the bums in Austin and the bums in Washington? That the pundits who expected a barnburner were full of chorizo?

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Bob Daemmrich

In Closing: Bill White

"My job is to communicate to as many people as I can about where I'd like to go in the future of this state," he said in Austin last week, "and to hope that people want a better future for this state and are willing to support somebody who will work for the people."

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In Closing: The Big Five

Whether or not the outcome of tomorrow's gubernatorial primary is conclusive — whether or not we have a runoff six weeks hence — we can say this with certainty: One of the five main candidates on the ballot will be the next governor of Texas. And this: 40 hours from now, we'll know much more about the state's coming political landscape than we do today. While we bide our time and wait for results, we present these final snapshots of the campaigns as they wound down.

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Gov. Rick Perry says he knows "it's a marathon, not a sprint" to November as he muses about the final days in the race for the GOP gubernatorial nomination.

In Closing: Rick Perry

“I treat every campaign seriously,” he says. “Nobody’s gonna outwork me. Nobody can put in more hours and go more places and do more things than I do.”

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In the closing days of the Democratic primary campaign, gubernatorial hopeful Farouk Shami visits San Antonio's Royal Palace Ballroom for a Latino senior citizens dance — and takes his own turn on the dance floor.

In Closing: Farouk Shami

“I’m a positive thinker. If I wasn’t sure of winning, I would not have put my foot in,” he said in his signature bullhorn tone, pressing his BlackBerry against his ear. “Hello? Hello? You’re speaking to the governor here.” 

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Brandi Grissom

In Closing: Kay Bailey Hutchison

“Things are going great. I feel good, and I’m going to campaign to the end,” she told a TV reporter shortly before Houston's Downtown Rodeo Parade. “I don’t think the polls are right.”

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Republican gubernatorial hopeful Debra Medina's final pitch to her supporters in her roller coaster ride of a primary campaign.

In Closing: Debra Medina

“We’ll do a runoff if we have to," she said Saturday. "I’d like to secure it outright." She paused and smiled. "It will be the upset of the century if that happens."

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Caleb Bryant Miller

The Brief: March 1, 2010

'Twas the day before the election, when all through the state/ The candidates were stirring, preparing for the big date/ The polls had been done by the pollsters with care/ But hopes remained that some wiggle room still would be there…

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Illustration by Courtesy of the Cole family

TribBlog: Perry Pardons Tim Cole

Gov. Rick Perry issued a posthumous pardon today for Tim Cole, who died in prison after he was wrongly convicted of rape.

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Jacob Villanueva

2010: Reyna Redux

In a midnight move before tomorrow’s election, 10th Court of Appeals Justice Felipe Reyna fired the opening salvos of a defamation lawsuit against a Longview doctor and two political action committees supporting his GOP primary opponent, Al Scoggins.

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Caleb Bryant Miller

Rick Perry vs. the DPS

While the director of the Department of Public Safety and some state senators argue that X-ray machines and metal detectors are critical in the wake of a shooting at the Capitol, the Governor and others in the Legislature worry that a gamut of security hurdles would make the place unwelcoming to the public.

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Caleb Bryant Miller

The Straight Story

One distinguishing feature of primary night is the absence of straight-ticket voting, which is why certain races that seem winnable now simply aren't in the fall. Take Collin County, where straight-ticket ballots favored R's over D's on Election Day 2008 at a rate of 66 to 33 percent. A Democrat “has literally got to be Jesus Christ running against Judas or he loses,” an analyst says.

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