Tribpedia: Voter ID

After six years and three legislative sessions of sharp debate divided along party lines, the Texas Legislature passed a law in 2011 that required voters to show a photo ID in order to vote. The House passed its version in March, 101-48. After differences between the Senate and House versions were ironed out, both chambers approved the final version,  ...

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and Mexican Ambassador to the U.S. Arturo Sarukhan
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and Mexican Ambassador to the U.S. Arturo Sarukhan

U.S., Mexican Leaders Say the Old PRI is Gone

The return to power of Mexico’s Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, is unlikely to be accompanied by the corruption that used to plague the party, say Arturo Sarukhan, the Mexican ambassador to the U.S., and former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson

Texas Secretary of State Hope Andrade watches the delivery of the Capitol Christmas trees at the south steps on November 28, 2011.
Texas Secretary of State Hope Andrade watches the delivery of the Capitol Christmas trees at the south steps on November 28, 2011.

A New Fight to SAVE Texas' Elections is Brewing

Texas Weekly

Texas officials want access to the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) database, which the secretary of state’s office said could be “one of many important resources for confirming voter eligibility.” 

Interactive Map: Texas DPS Office Locations

If preclearance for the state’s voter ID law is granted, the state has promised to issue free “election identification certificates," forms of photo ID for use only in voting. But some argue that Texas voters could have a tough time reaching the Department of Public Safety offices to get those IDs. Take a look for yourself at our map of the all the DPS driver's license offices in Texas.

Gov. Rick Perry in his Capitol office on Feb. 21, 2012.
Gov. Rick Perry in his Capitol office on Feb. 21, 2012.

A States' Rights Strategy

Texas Weekly

Gone are the deer-in-the-headlights “oops” moments, the campaign blooper reels. They’ve been replaced with the familiar Texas governor beating his drum against the federal government, this time on women’s health and voter fraud.