Alexa Ura Reporter

Alexa Ura covers politics and demographics for The Texas Tribune, where she started as an intern in 2013. She previously covered health care for the Trib. While earning her journalism degree at the University of Texas at Austin, she was a reporter and editor for The Daily Texan. A Laredo native, Alexa is a fluent Spanish-speaker and is constantly seeking genuine Mexican food in Austin.

Recent Contributions

Court Tosses Challenge to Couple's Same-Sex Marriage License

Sarah Goodfriend, second from left, and Suzanne Bryant, center, with their daughters (far left and far right) and Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir, second from right. DeBeauvoir issued Goodfriend and Bryant a marriage license on Feb. 19, 2015.
Sarah Goodfriend, second from left, and Suzanne Bryant, center, with their daughters (far left and far right) and Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir, second from right. DeBeauvoir issued Goodfriend and Bryant a marriage license on Feb. 19, 2015.

The Texas Supreme Court on Friday tossed out Attorney General Ken Paxton’s effort to undo the union of the first gay couple to legally wed in Texas.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter: We Will Increase Austin Presence

U.S Secretary of Defense is Ashton Carter, visits the University of Texas at Austin where he held a discussion with students on March 31, 2016
U.S Secretary of Defense is Ashton Carter, visits the University of Texas at Austin where he held a discussion with students on March 31, 2016
Texas Weekly

Also, Greg Abbott makes good on a promise to pay more attention to black business community, addresses leaders at an African American Chambers of Commerce summit at the Capitol.

FDA Revises Rules for Drug-Induced Abortions

A day after a federal appeals court allowed Texas to begin enforcing new abortion restrictions, a group protested the ruling on the South Steps of the Texas Capitol building.
A day after a federal appeals court allowed Texas to begin enforcing new abortion restrictions, a group protested the ruling on the South Steps of the Texas Capitol building.

Texas women will be able to obtain medical abortions later into their pregnancies under newly approved changes by the federal Food and Drug Administration. 

Suburban Population Continues to Surge in Texas

Hays County — with its population spread across suburbs like Buda, Wimberley and Dripping Springs — is the fastest-growing county in Texas among those with populations greater than 10,000.
Hays County — with its population spread across suburbs like Buda, Wimberley and Dripping Springs — is the fastest-growing county in Texas among those with populations greater than 10,000.

Texas’ suburban population continues to surge, with growth in some suburban counties outpacing growth in  the state’s biggest cities, new U.S. Census Bureau figures show.

State Officials Note Significant Drop in Texas Abortions

Lara Chelian, center, and her mother Renee Chilean, both abortion providers from Michigan, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside, Mar. 2, 2016. The case is focused on Texas law HB2, which if enforced would result in the closure of more than 75 percent of all women’s health clinics that provide abortion services in the state.
Lara Chelian, center, and her mother Renee Chilean, both abortion providers from Michigan, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside, Mar. 2, 2016. The case is focused on Texas law HB2, which if enforced would result in the closure of more than 75 percent of all women’s health clinics that provide abortion services in the state.

The number of abortions performed in Texas dropped 14.2 percent in 2014, with almost 9,000 fewer procedures in the state compared to the year before.

Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Abortion Restrictions

Protesters hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside.
Protesters hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside.

During oral arguments Wednesday in a case challenging the constitutionality of Texas’ abortion restrictions, U.S. Supreme Court justices focused on what role the rules played in closing dozens of clinics.