Falling Behind

Falling Behind is a 10-part series on the flip side of state leaders’ aggressive pursuit of the "Texas Miracle.” You can also read our related Hurting For Work series here, or subscribe to our water and education newsletters here.

Callie Richmond

Climate Scientists: Texas is Missing an Opportunity

Texas-based climate scientists — some of the world's most renowned — say that Texas could be a global leader in protecting against climate change. But if state agencies continue to fail to take climate change into account when planning for the state’s future, the scientists argue, Texans will suffer a direct impact.

 

 

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Bob Daemmrich

As Teacher Pay Lags, Attrition, Class Size Grow

Stacked up against other states, Texas public schools could win the best-bang-for-your-buck competition. The state spends less than most others, and its students perform better than many. But the commitment to fiscal restraint has come with its own burdens for the teachers responsible for educating the state’s future workforce.

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Tamir Kalifa

Academic Gains Slowing; No Consensus on Why

For years, Texas policymakers have pushed for increasingly advanced science and math course requirements, along with standardized test-driven accountability, to improve academic performance at public schools. And over the last decade, students have made steady progress on a number of academic measures. But that improvement has begun to stall.

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Callie Richmond

On Higher Ed Goals, State is Seeing a Mixed Bag

As the state's 15-year higher education plan comes to an end, some objectives in key areas — including college enrollment among certain ethnic groups and degrees awarded in math and science — are unlikely to be met. The state's plan has been credited with preventing a discouraging tide from getting worse in higher education.

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Michael Stravato

Manufacturing Giant's Water Woes a Sign of What's to Come

Dow Chemical's struggles to secure enough water supplies for its growing operations in Texas have sparked concerns about whether the state's diminishing natural resources can accommodate its exploding population and economy. Critics, including Dow, say Texas is falling behind in planning properly for its water future.

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