Neena Satija Reporter

Neena Satija covers the environment for the Tribune. A native of the Washington, D.C. area, she graduated from Yale University in 2011, and then worked for a number of area news outlets, including the New Haven Independent, the Connecticut Mirror, and WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio. She has also been a regular contributor to National Public Radio. She previously worked for the Toledo Blade, the Dallas Morning News, and the Boston Globe. In her spare time, she enjoys singing (especially in group settings), running, and playing the addictive board game Settlers of Catan. As an East Coast transplant she is particularly thrilled with Austin tacos and warm weather.

Recent Contributions

Before Central Texas Flooding, Officials Sounded Alarm

Residents of Wimberley survey the devastation after the Blanco River crested its banks along River Road in Wimberley on May 25, 2015.
Residents of Wimberley survey the devastation after the Blanco River crested its banks along River Road in Wimberley on May 25, 2015.

When Wimberley residents woke up Sunday to flooding, the surprise was palpable: The area had been going through a drought. But months earlier, local officials had voiced concerns about the rapidly growing region's vulnerability to flooding.

 

OSHA Chief: Fine for Deadly Leak "Petty Cash" for DuPont

DuPont's chemical plant in La Porte. In November 2014, a toxic gas leak killed four workers inside a unit that manufactures a popular insecticide called Lannate.
DuPont's chemical plant in La Porte. In November 2014, a toxic gas leak killed four workers inside a unit that manufactures a popular insecticide called Lannate.

Seven months after a toxic gas leak killed four workers at DuPont’s chemical plant in La Porte, a top U.S. labor official blasted the company’s commitment to workplace safety, saying he wished he could hand out a stiffer punishment.

 

Reveal Radio: "Cop Watchers" Police the Police

Antonio Buehler, co-founder of the Peaceful Streets Project, films law enforcement during a public intoxication near the University of Texas at Austin on April 24, 2015.
Antonio Buehler, co-founder of the Peaceful Streets Project, films law enforcement during a public intoxication near the University of Texas at Austin on April 24, 2015.

Most of the high-profile cases of alleged police abuse today are caught on tape by people who happen to be walking by. But there's also an organized movement of "cop watchers" who consider it their jobs to police the police.

Texas a Flashpoint in Debate Over Right to Film Police

Steve Donahue, of the Peaceful Streets Project, filmed law enforcement during a public intoxication near the University of Texas at Austin on April 24, 2015.
Steve Donahue, of the Peaceful Streets Project, filmed law enforcement during a public intoxication near the University of Texas at Austin on April 24, 2015.

As videos play an ever larger role in cases of alleged police brutality, "cop watching" is attracting organized activists in communities across the country. Clashes with police are inevitable, and now both sides are asking lawmakers to help clarify the ground rules. 

 

Report: Smart Lawn Watering Could Save Big

A green lawn in the Olmos Park neighborhood of San Antonio, shown on June 5, 2012.
A green lawn in the Olmos Park neighborhood of San Antonio, shown on June 5, 2012.

Even Texans with the greenest of lawns are watering them too much, experts say. And if everyone would turn on the sprinklers only twice a week — still probably more than necessary — the water savings would be significant, according to a report released Tuesday.

Houston Suburb Looks to Bill for Water Fix

Leticia Ramirez, a cook at the Loving Care Learning Center in Castlewood, shows how staff use filtered water to wash their hands during the regular, random water shut-offs this unincorporated community eperiences.
Leticia Ramirez, a cook at the Loving Care Learning Center in Castlewood, shows how staff use filtered water to wash their hands during the regular, random water shut-offs this unincorporated community eperiences.

Residents of a small unincorporated community outside Houston hope legislation by state Rep. Armando Walle will help them get safe, reliable water service, and shine a light on parts of Texas with similar problems.