Neena Satija Reporter

Neena Satija covers the environment for the Tribune. A native of the Washington, D.C. area, she graduated from Yale University in 2011, and then worked for a number of area news outlets, including the New Haven Independent, the Connecticut Mirror, and WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio. She has also been a regular contributor to National Public Radio. She previously worked for the Toledo Blade, the Dallas Morning News, and the Boston Globe. In her spare time, she enjoys singing (especially in group settings), running, and playing the addictive board game Settlers of Catan. As an East Coast transplant she is particularly thrilled with Austin tacos and warm weather.

Recent Contributions

Report: Smart Lawn Watering Could Save Big

A green lawn in the Olmos Park neighborhood of San Antonio, shown on June 5, 2012.
A green lawn in the Olmos Park neighborhood of San Antonio, shown on June 5, 2012.

Even Texans with the greenest of lawns are watering them too much, experts say. And if everyone would turn on the sprinklers only twice a week — still probably more than necessary — the water savings would be significant, according to a report released Tuesday.

Houston Suburb Looks to Bill for Water Fix

Leticia Ramirez, a cook at the Loving Care Learning Center in Castlewood, shows how staff use filtered water to wash their hands during the regular, random water shut-offs this unincorporated community eperiences.
Leticia Ramirez, a cook at the Loving Care Learning Center in Castlewood, shows how staff use filtered water to wash their hands during the regular, random water shut-offs this unincorporated community eperiences.

Residents of a small unincorporated community outside Houston hope legislation by state Rep. Armando Walle will help them get safe, reliable water service, and shine a light on parts of Texas with similar problems. 

Houston Dry Cleaner at Center of Pollution Debate

Trey Melcher in front of his family's shopping center, where River Oaks Cleaners is a tenant. The Melchers feel they've been unfairly targeted by Harris County in an environmental lawsuit that seeks up to $173 million.
Trey Melcher in front of his family's shopping center, where River Oaks Cleaners is a tenant. The Melchers feel they've been unfairly targeted by Harris County in an environmental lawsuit that seeks up to $173 million.

A dry cleaner tucked in one of Houston's most expensive neighborhoods has become the epicenter of a contentious debate over the enforcement of Texas' environmental laws.