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Matt Stiles

Latest Contributions

 Bob Daemmrich

At Blackout Hearing, Big Political Donors Grilled

The big power companies in Texas on the hot seat during a Senate hearing about this month's rolling blackouts have donated more than $400,000 since 2000 to members of the two committees asking questions. The donations are part of nearly $4 million in campaign money the companies and their employees have spent on political candidates during that time.

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 Graphic by Matt Stiles/Many Eyes

Interactive: Texas Political Spending: July 1-Dec. 31, 2010

The Texas Ethics Commission now requires political candidates to document their political spending in specific categories — advertising, consulting, polling, etc. — allowing the public to better understand campaign-finance filings. This interactive bubble chart visualizes those spending categories by candidate, political party and election type in the second half of 2010.

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Who Profited Most in the Fall Campaign?

We already know that the major-party candidates in the governor's race spent more on advertising than others on last year's ballot, thanks to the cost of television. But some other ad vendors also received lucrative business from the competitive state House races, with mixed results.

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 Illustration by Todd Wiseman

Interactive: Campaign Totals

How much did state-level candidates raise, spend and owe in the closing days of 2010 — and how much do they still have for future campaigns? Our interactive table lets you sort the totals by dollar amounts, election type, political party and candidate status.

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 Graphic by Matt Stiles

On the Records: Once, Twice, Three Times a Governor

Most people know that Gov. Rick Perry, inaugurated to a third term Tuesday, has served longer than any other chief executive in Texas history. What's remarkable, though, is just how much longer than the state's previous governors — even those who've served during the modern era.

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 Graphic by Matt Stiles

Search: Texas Legislature Bills

With the 82nd Legislative Session in only its second week, Texas lawmakers have already filed more than 900 bills, potential laws addressing hundreds of subjects ranging from abortion and immigration to health care and wrongful imprisonment. This application aims to help Texans make sense of the legislative process, tracking proposed pieces of legislation as they move through the Texas House and Senate.

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 Texas Tribune

Data App: Capitol Maps

As the 181 members of the Texas Legislature convene in Austin for the 82nd session, use our interactive and printable guide to find their offices and navigate the maze that is the Texas Capitol. Search by member name, or browse using the floor plan by clicking the tab for each floor in the Capitol and Capitol Extension.

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 Graphic by Wordle.net

On the Records: The Bills So Far

A new word cloud visualizes the bills filed so far according to their Texas Legislative Council assigned categories. After education, which accounts for more than a quarter of the bills, the top categories are elections, criminal procedure, vehicles and traffic, and taxation.

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 Illustration by Todd Wiseman

Data App: Ethics Fines

The Texas Ethics Commission levied more than $140,000 in fines in 2010 following complaints that candidates, officeholders and others violated laws governing elections, lobbying or holding political office. Since 2004, $650,000 in fines have been issued. Use our database to search the records.

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 Matt Stiles

Interactive: Texas Lobbyist Conflicts: 2005-2010

State law requires lobbyists to disclose to the Texas Ethics Commission any conflicts of interests involving their clients. They also must notify their clients. The disclosure forms aren't public information, but the commission released a list of lobbyists and the total number of conflicts they've reported since 2005. Use this table to sort that list.

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 Matt Stiles

Confidential Conflicts

Lobbyists are required by law to notify their clients if they represent two or more groups with clashing agendas. They are also required to notify the Texas Ethics Commission. Scores of lobbyists have done so in recent legislative sessions. What is not required is for the public or elected representatives to be informed.

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 Illustration by Todd Wiseman

Congressional Clout

For the seventh consecutive decade, Texas will gain seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the decennial apportionment process, which means extra clout after the 2012 elections. With Republicans in control of redrawing the state's congressional districts — and adding the four new seats — they stand to benefit the most.

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