Updated Interactive: West Nile Virus Cases, Deaths Statewide

In the last two weeks, the number of reported cases of the West Nile virus has nearly doubled in Texas. There were 30 deaths out of a total 723 reported cases of the virus in Texas as of Aug. 27, according to the Department of State Heath Services.

North Texas has been hit with the worst outbreak of the virus, with more than 200 cases reported in Dallas County and at least 174 cases reported in Tarrant County. As The Dallas Morning News reports, the death count in Dallas increased to 12 since the DSHS released the counts used to make this interactive. And the county is continuing to spray insecticide to kill mosquitoes in high-risk areas.

The majority of the cases reported in Texas, nearly 400, have resulted in West Nile neuroinvasive disease, which occurs when the virus penetrates the blood brain barrier. In worst-case scenarios, West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease could lead to long-term fatigue, vision loss, paralysis — or even death. There's also been 331 cases of the milder version of the virus, called West Nile fever, which includes symptoms such as abdominal pain, gastrointestinal problems, fever, rashes, muscle aches and weakness.

You can find more information on the West Nile Virus here.

Scroll over the bars in the graphic to see exact numbers of fatal and nonfatal cases. To see only the number of fatal cases statewide, click on the legend to remove the number of nonfatal cases from view. Hover over counties on the map to see details about the number of deaths and types of West Nile cases.

Texas Tribune donors or members may be quoted or mentioned in our stories, or may be the subject of them. For a complete list of contributors, click here.

Comment Policy

The Texas Tribune is pleased to provide the opportunity for you to share your observations about this story. We encourage lively debate on the issues of the day, but we ask that you refrain from using profanity or other offensive speech, engaging in personal attacks or name-calling, posting advertising, or wandering away from the topic at hand. To comment, you must be a registered user of the Tribune, and your user name will be displayed. Thanks for taking time to offer your thoughts.

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Sign-Up