Neena Satija Reporter

Neena Satija covers the environment for the Tribune. A native of the Washington, D.C. area, she graduated from Yale University in 2011, and then worked for a number of area news outlets, including the New Haven Independent, the Connecticut Mirror, and WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio. She has also been a regular contributor to National Public Radio. She previously worked for the Toledo Blade, the Dallas Morning News, and the Boston Globe. In her spare time, she enjoys singing (especially in group settings), running, and playing the addictive board game Settlers of Catan. As an East Coast transplant she is particularly thrilled with Austin tacos and warm weather.

Recent Contributions

Friday Night Football Returns to Water Politics

Texas Governor Rick Perry ceremonially signed House Bill 4, which lays the foundation for Texas' future water needs. He is joined by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Allan Ritter, R-Nederland and Sen. Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay on May 28, 2013
Texas Governor Rick Perry ceremonially signed House Bill 4, which lays the foundation for Texas' future water needs. He is joined by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Allan Ritter, R-Nederland and Sen. Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay on May 28, 2013

Two years ago, the drought prompted a rare outbreak of teamwork as lawmakers from both parties and most corners of Texas together crafted a $2 billion fund to provide more water. This session, though, it looks like we're going back to good old-fashioned water rivalries.

Groundwater Wars Brewing in Austin's Suburbs

Electro Purification's wells (the yellow dots on the map) are outside any regulator's purview. They're also near many other wells that depend on the Trinity Aquifer (the blue and green dots).
Electro Purification's wells (the yellow dots on the map) are outside any regulator's purview. They're also near many other wells that depend on the Trinity Aquifer (the blue and green dots).

A crack in Texas' mishmash groundwater regulatory framework is allowing a water company to pump a huge amount of water from underneath Hays County with virtually no oversight. 

No Word Yet From Abbott on Special Election Runoffs

State Reps. José Menéndez (l.) and Trey Martinez-Fischer, both from San Antonio Districts, are seeking the state Senate seat vacated by Leticia Van de Putte, who is running for mayor of that city.
State Reps. José Menéndez (l.) and Trey Martinez-Fischer, both from San Antonio Districts, are seeking the state Senate seat vacated by Leticia Van de Putte, who is running for mayor of that city.
Texas Weekly

The work of setting up committees has begun in both chambers, and an interesting poll surfaces on support for ending diversions from the sporting goods tax.

Obama's Methane Plan: Why It Matters for Texas

Workers with Bee Cave Drilling install a jackhammer bit on the drilling rig while putting in a water well on a private lot in Spicewood, Texas on February 6, 2012.
Workers with Bee Cave Drilling install a jackhammer bit on the drilling rig while putting in a water well on a private lot in Spicewood, Texas on February 6, 2012.

On Wednesday, the Obama administration announced another major plan to combat climate change that aims to slash emissions of methane gas in the next decade by almost a half. Here’s why that’s a big deal for Texas.

Marvin Nichols Reservoir Stays in State Plan

The Hearts Bluff Mitigation Bank as pictured with the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir.
The Hearts Bluff Mitigation Bank as pictured with the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir.

The plan to build the Marvin Nichols Reservoir has been a subject of contention between Dallas-Fort Worth officials and opponents in Northeast Texas. State officials voted Thursday to keep the lake in the state water plan, but the dispute is far from over.

TPPF Building the Foundation of Texas Conservatism

The Texas Public Policy Foundation's new building is under construction on Congress Avenue in Austin.
The Texas Public Policy Foundation's new building is under construction on Congress Avenue in Austin.

Its brand-new headquarters is almost done, and its influence on public policy in Texas — and nationally — cannot be denied. At age 25, the Texas Public Policy Foundation is the big kid on the block among Austin think tanks. 

Politics of Climate Change in Texas Have Shifted

A view of the Houston Ship Channel from the back of the Sam Houston tour boat in Feb. 2014.
A view of the Houston Ship Channel from the back of the Sam Houston tour boat in Feb. 2014.

Texas leaders weren't always so skeptical about climate change. But the state's rightward shift, coupled with a booming oil and gas economy, have changed the tenor of the debate. This story was produced in collaboration with The World.

Hotter, Drier Projections Threaten Texas Miracle

The decreasing water line on Lake Arrowhead, one of three lakes the city of Wichita Falls gets its water from, is pictured here on Jan. 25, 2013.
The decreasing water line on Lake Arrowhead, one of three lakes the city of Wichita Falls gets its water from, is pictured here on Jan. 25, 2013.

Climate scientists project that Texas will be hotter and drier in the coming decades, which means less rainwater will make it into lakes and reservoirs, and more will evaporate. That could spell trouble for the state's fast-growing cities and industry.