Vote signs outside early voting locations in Austin on Feb. 23, 2014.
Vote signs outside early voting locations in Austin on Feb. 23, 2014.

Analysis: A Missing Piece in the Voter ID Debate

State leaders asked for and received a study that said the voter photo ID law would leave more than a half-million voters without required state-issued IDs. But they didn't tell most legislators about it, according to a federal judge's findings. And recent court rulings put that law into a strange place: It is simultaneously enforceable and unconstitutional.

 
 

New in TribTalk: Scheck on Max Soffar

In 1981, Max Soffar was sentenced to death for the murder of three people at a Houston bowling alley. Soffar, who has spent three decades on death row, says his confessions were coerced. Prosecutors say that the case against him is solid, and police officers deny accusations of coercion.
In 1981, Max Soffar was sentenced to death for the murder of three people at a Houston bowling alley. Soffar, who has spent three decades on death row, says his confessions were coerced. Prosecutors say that the case against him is solid, and police officers deny accusations of coercion.

Let Max Soffar — an innocent man on death row in Texas who is dying of liver cancer — spend his last days at home, writes Barry Scheck of the Innocence Project.

Texas Takes Last Pass at Social Studies Textbooks

State Board of Education members work their way through proposed revisions to social studies textbooks at a meeting with publishers in Austin on Monday, October 20, 2014.
State Board of Education members work their way through proposed revisions to social studies textbooks at a meeting with publishers in Austin on Monday, October 20, 2014.

In a month, the State Board of Education will take a final vote on the social studies textbooks that will be used in the state's public schools for the next eight years. 

Ebola Task Force Chief: "This is the New Normal"

Dr. Brett Giroir, director of the Texas Task Force on Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response, speaks during the panel's first public hearing on Oct. 23. At left is Dr. Kyle Janek and at right is Dr. David Lakey.
Dr. Brett Giroir, director of the Texas Task Force on Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response, speaks during the panel's first public hearing on Oct. 23. At left is Dr. Kyle Janek and at right is Dr. David Lakey.

Texas needs to be better prepared to respond to emerging infectious diseases like Ebola, the director of a new state task force on such diseases said Thursday.

State Fights Release of Race Records

Glenn Johnson, 55, was injured in a smelting accident near Amarillo in 1997 in which a furnace filled with molten metal exploded, crushed him and left major burns over 90 percent of his body. His left arm was amputated and all but two the muscles in his right forearm were removed.
Glenn Johnson, 55, was injured in a smelting accident near Amarillo in 1997 in which a furnace filled with molten metal exploded, crushed him and left major burns over 90 percent of his body. His left arm was amputated and all but two the muscles in his right forearm were removed.

The Texas Department of Insurance is fighting the Tribune’s request for records that could shed light on why the agency has failed to collect racial data on injured workers, despite a 1993 law that requires it.