Edgar Walters

Recent Contributions

Lawmakers Push "Right to Try" Experimental Drugs

Capitol lobbyist Andrea Sloan waged a public battle with ovarian cancer, seeking federal permission to try an experimental treatment in 2013. She died Jan. 1, 2014.
Capitol lobbyist Andrea Sloan waged a public battle with ovarian cancer, seeking federal permission to try an experimental treatment in 2013. She died Jan. 1, 2014.

It’s kind of like Dallas Buyers Club: A group of sick Texans is seeking to gain access to experimental drugs — only this time, a flurry of state lawmakers is rushing to help them. In Austin, the movement hits a personal chord. 

As State Ages, Families Face Caring for Elderly at Home

After her father was injured in a fire, Eva Bonilla took him into her home and cared for him until his death in 2010.
After her father was injured in a fire, Eva Bonilla took him into her home and cared for him until his death in 2010.

Eva Bonilla's story is one version of an oft-told tale. When her ailing, elderly father had nowhere else to go, she quit her job and brought him into her home. As Texas ages, more children will do the same, and experts worry that their skills and resources will be tested.

 

Echoes of Fights Past in Health Agency Consolidation

Sen. Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, wraps up the Sunset Advisory Commission hearing on Jan. 14, 2015.
Sen. Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, wraps up the Sunset Advisory Commission hearing on Jan. 14, 2015.

Twelve years after a major mash-up of state health agencies, the Sunset Commission and several lawmakers say it's time to finish the job and merge the remaining five systems into one. Some veteran Capitol observers say they're feeling déjà vu.

The Health Care Budget: Four Things to Know

Department of Public Safety troopers guard the governor's office on April 1, 2013, as a group protests Republicans' stance on Medicaid expansion.
Department of Public Safety troopers guard the governor's office on April 1, 2013, as a group protests Republicans' stance on Medicaid expansion.

Texas can rebel against Obamacare and Medicaid expansion all it wants, but enrollment in the state's insurance program for the poor is growing, and the federal government will be paying for less of it. An additional $1.3 billion might be needed just to maintain the status quo.

Arkansas Medicaid Plan Offers Mixed Lessons

Department of Public Safety troopers guard the governor's office on April 1, 2013, as a group protests Republicans' stance on Medicaid expansion.
Department of Public Safety troopers guard the governor's office on April 1, 2013, as a group protests Republicans' stance on Medicaid expansion.

Early on, supporters of Medicaid expansion pointed to Arkansas as an example of how Texas might go about helping insure its poor. But lately, the neighbor's grass doesn't look quite as green.