Julián Aguilar Reporter

Julián Aguilar reports on politics and border affairs from the Texas-Mexico border. His focuses include immigration reform and enforcement, voter ID, international trade, border security, and the drug trade. His political coverage has included local, legislative and congressional races in Texas, as well as local and national elections in Mexico. Before joining the Tribune, he was a freelance writer for the Fort Worth Weekly; a government and crime reporter for the Laredo Morning Times; and a political writer for the Rio Grande Guardian. A native of El Paso, he has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Texas and a master's degree in journalism from the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas.

Recent Contributions

Families Accuse Bank of Laundering Gang Money

A Juárez municipal police officer keeps patrol while at a murder scene in the outskirts of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico on May 28, 2010.
A Juárez municipal police officer keeps patrol while at a murder scene in the outskirts of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico on May 28, 2010.

The families of several U.S. citizens murdered in Mexico filed a lawsuit this week against HSBC Holdings and its subsidiaries alleging the company supported various drug cartel activities by laundering millions of dollars for gangs.

Lawyers for Texas Talk Strategy on SCOTUS Immigration Hearing

Texas First Assistant Attorney General Chip Roy and Solicitor General Scott Keller sat down with Tribune reporter Julián Aguilar on Feb. 1, 2016 to discuss an upcoming case on illegal immigration headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Texas First Assistant Attorney General Chip Roy and Solicitor General Scott Keller sat down with Tribune reporter Julián Aguilar on Feb. 1, 2016 to discuss an upcoming case on illegal immigration headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to hear a case challenging President Barack Obama's executive order on illegal immigration, the two top lawyers for Texas spoke to the Tribune about what the state is fighting for.

As Feds Plan to Cut Border Monitoring, Texas Officials Ask Why

A Customs and Border Protection vehicle patrols on the Texas border near the Rio Grande, Thursday, July 24, 2014, in Mission, Texas. Texas is spending $1.3 million a week for a bigger DPS presence along the border.
A Customs and Border Protection vehicle patrols on the Texas border near the Rio Grande, Thursday, July 24, 2014, in Mission, Texas. Texas is spending $1.3 million a week for a bigger DPS presence along the border.

Gov. Greg Abbott and U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Laredo Democrat, pressed the Department of Homeland Security on Monday to explain why the agency plans to reduce its aerial surveillance on the Texas-Mexico border.

 

Border Catholics Wonder What Message Pope Francis Will Bring

A cardboard cutout of His Holiness Pope Francis  greets residents of Ciudad Juárez on January 16, 2016. Pope Francis will visit the border city in February as part of a six-day tour of Mexico.
A cardboard cutout of His Holiness Pope Francis greets residents of Ciudad Juárez on January 16, 2016. Pope Francis will visit the border city in February as part of a six-day tour of Mexico.

With Pope Francis scheduled to visit Ciudad Juárez next month, the area's Catholics are speculating whether the famously outspoken pontiff will bring up hot-button social issues such as immigration, poverty and corruption.

U.S. Supreme Court to Consider Obama's Immigration Program

Immigrants and activists participate in press conference and rally on Nov. 19, 2015, before a 37-mile march designed to show support for immigration reform. The marchers planned to walk for three days, from the federal immigration detention facility in Taylor to the Texas Governor's Mansion in downtown Austin.
Immigrants and activists participate in press conference and rally on Nov. 19, 2015, before a 37-mile march designed to show support for immigration reform. The marchers planned to walk for three days, from the federal immigration detention facility in Taylor to the Texas Governor's Mansion in downtown Austin.

The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Tuesday to consider the Obama administration’s controversial immigration program, which has been on hold for nearly a year after being blocked by a Texas-based federal judge.