Julián Aguilar Reporter

Julián Aguilar reports on politics and border affairs from the Texas-Mexico border. His focuses include immigration reform and enforcement, voter ID, international trade, border security, and the drug trade. His political coverage has included local, legislative and congressional races in Texas, as well as local and national elections in Mexico. Before joining the Tribune, he was a freelance writer for the Fort Worth Weekly; a government and crime reporter for the Laredo Morning Times; and a political writer for the Rio Grande Guardian. A native of El Paso, he has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Texas and a master's degree in journalism from the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas.

Recent Contributions

State Explores Flexing Legal Muscles on Immigration

Protesters block a rear entrance to Texas Governor Rick Perry's office on the second floor protesting HB12 the so-called "sanctuary cities" bill winding its way through the Senate on May 25, 2011.
Protesters block a rear entrance to Texas Governor Rick Perry's office on the second floor protesting HB12 the so-called "sanctuary cities" bill winding its way through the Senate on May 25, 2011.

Crafted carefully, state laws can be written that would allow Texas to crack down on undocumented immigrants and illegal border crossers without running afoul of the U.S. Constitution, a state attorney told lawmakers recently.

State Wants More Time for Immigration Appeal

Scott Keller, the Texas Solicitor General, speaks to reporters after delivering oral arguments before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in New Orleans.
Scott Keller, the Texas Solicitor General, speaks to reporters after delivering oral arguments before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in New Orleans.

The Texas Attorney General’s office is asking the U.S. Supreme Court for an extra 30 days to respond to the Obama Administration's appeal of lower court rulings that have blocked controversial changes in immigration enforcement.

Feds to Ask High Court to Consider Immigration Program

From left, immigration rights activists Manuel Ramirez, Lucian Villasenor and Adrian Orozco protest President Obama's Civil Rights Summit speech at the University of Texas in 2014, challenging the president's dedication to civil rights.
From left, immigration rights activists Manuel Ramirez, Lucian Villasenor and Adrian Orozco protest President Obama's Civil Rights Summit speech at the University of Texas in 2014, challenging the president's dedication to civil rights.

The Obama administration said Tuesday that it would ask the U.S. Supreme Court to consider a controversial immigration program the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down on Monday.