Julián Aguilar Reporter

Julián Aguilar reports on politics and border affairs from the Texas-Mexico border. His focuses include immigration reform and enforcement, voter ID, international trade, border security, and the drug trade. His political coverage has included local, legislative and congressional races in Texas, as well as local and national elections in Mexico. Before joining the Tribune, he was a freelance writer for the Fort Worth Weekly; a government and crime reporter for the Laredo Morning Times; and a political writer for the Rio Grande Guardian. A native of El Paso, he has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Texas and a master's degree in journalism from the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas.

Recent Contributions

Torn Between Higher Taxes and Border Hassles

Two women carry goods as they walk to the Paso del Norte International Bridge between the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez border on Jan. 10, 2014, in El Paso.
Two women carry goods as they walk to the Paso del Norte International Bridge between the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez border on Jan. 10, 2014, in El Paso.

Local government officials are eyeing extra revenue from Mexicans crossing the Rio Grande to save on items after a sales tax increase in Mexico's border regions. But cross-border traffic could deter some of the potential customers.

Mexican Violence, Resolution Lead to Questions About U.S. Aid

Gutierrez, who is awaiting a hearing on his request for asylum in the U.S., stands in front of the Texas Capitol after his 12-day ride across the state. The focus of his journey was to raise awareness about the impunity for violent criminals in Mexico and to support his fellow asylum-seekers. What it isn’t, he said, is a protest of the U.S. government.
Gutierrez, who is awaiting a hearing on his request for asylum in the U.S., stands in front of the Texas Capitol after his 12-day ride across the state. The focus of his journey was to raise awareness about the impunity for violent criminals in Mexico and to support his fellow asylum-seekers. What it isn’t, he said, is a protest of the U.S. government.

In the wake of more violence and a resolution urging the U.S. to grant asylum to Mexicans, activists are urging lawmakers to review aid aimed at helping to end that country's drug war.