Jim Malewitz

Jim Malewitz covers energy for the Tribune. Before arriving, he spent two years covering energy and environmental issues for Stateline, a nonprofit news service in Washington, D.C., where his work also appeared in The Washington Post and Chicago Tribune, among other newspapers. A native of Michigan, Jim has an undergraduate degree from Grinnell College in Iowa, where he played varsity baseball. He also holds a master’s from the University of Iowa, where he helped launch the nonprofit Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism. Jim loves tacos and barbecue, making him a good match for Austin’s eating scene. However, he remains on the lookout for great waffles.

Recent Contributions

Video: Abbott Takes Immigration Message to D.C.

A cheerful Gov. Greg Abbott predicts that any challenge to Judge Andrew S. Hanen's recent amnesty ruling will be rejected on appeal at a Texas Capitol press conference on Feb. 18, 2015.
A cheerful Gov. Greg Abbott predicts that any challenge to Judge Andrew S. Hanen's recent amnesty ruling will be rejected on appeal at a Texas Capitol press conference on Feb. 18, 2015.

Appearing on a pair of national news shows Sunday, Gov. Greg Abbott promised to fight President Obama's executive action on immigration all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, where he said the case would "no doubt" end up. 

 

Legislation Would Let Tesla Sell in Texas

Tesla vehicle on display outside the Texas Capitol on January 15th, 2015
Tesla vehicle on display outside the Texas Capitol on January 15th, 2015

A group of state lawmakers have filed legislation that would allow Tesla to sell its luxury electric cars at as many as 12 stores in Texas, renewing the California-based company’s challenge to a state law protecting franchised auto dealers.

West Texas Site Wants Nation's Spent Nuclear Fuel

Modular concrete canisters containing nuclear waste are shown at the bottom of a storage pit near Andrews, Texas.
Modular concrete canisters containing nuclear waste are shown at the bottom of a storage pit near Andrews, Texas.

The country has been trying to figure out for decades what to do with the high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. The operators of a nuclear waste dump in West Texas have told federal officials they'd be happy to take it.