Tribpedia: Texas Medical Association

The Texas Medical Association (TMA) was organized by 35 physicians in 1853 to serve the people of Texas in matters of medical care, prevention and cure of disease, and the improvement of public health.

TMA supports Texas physicians by providing solutions to the challenges they encounter in the care of patients. Nearly 45,000 physicians and medical students are members.

Doctors, Telemedicine Companies Meet to Plot New Course

A health care provider demonstrates a form of telemedicine using a video consultation. Physicians' and industry groups are negotiating new rules governing telemedicine.
A health care provider demonstrates a form of telemedicine using a video consultation. Physicians' and industry groups are negotiating new rules governing telemedicine.

Lobbyists for doctors' groups and the telemedicine industry hope to hammer out a compromise over the state's rules governing long-distance health care by the end of the summer. The question is whether they can keep the peace between doctors, telemedicine companies and health insurers until state lawmakers convene in 2017.

Physician Christine Le, an osteopathy specialist at the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic in Houston, checks up on her patients Mary Ann Goolsby and her husband Joseph Goolsby, Tuesday June 10, 2014.
Physician Christine Le, an osteopathy specialist at the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic in Houston, checks up on her patients Mary Ann Goolsby and her husband Joseph Goolsby, Tuesday June 10, 2014.

Trying to Limit Outside Influence in Prescribing Drugs

More doctors and medical facilities are working to reduce interactions between physicians and pharmaceutical representatives, and they have some support from the pharmaceutical industry.

Dr. Rose Okoro, a nurse practitioner, who owns Daystar Family Clinic in Katy, is shown on May 12. 2014. She says she has struggled to treat a greater number of Medicaid patients because of state regulations.
Dr. Rose Okoro, a nurse practitioner, who owns Daystar Family Clinic in Katy, is shown on May 12. 2014. She says she has struggled to treat a greater number of Medicaid patients because of state regulations.

Nurse Practitioners Look to Ease Supervision Rules

Nurse practitioners say state regulations, which link them to supervising physicians, limit their ability to treat patients in a state with a looming shortage of primary care physicians. 

Helen Hawkins, a certified pediatric nurse practitioner, treats 13-month-old Kevin Gorostieta at Carousel Pediatrics in Austin on Nov. 8, 2012.
Helen Hawkins, a certified pediatric nurse practitioner, treats 13-month-old Kevin Gorostieta at Carousel Pediatrics in Austin on Nov. 8, 2012.

Medicaid Fraud Settlement Worries Health Providers

For providers who treat the state’s poorest patients, a settlement between the state and a Medicaid provider raises questions about how the state distinguishes fraudulent intent from human error.

Nurse practitioner Christina Blanco speaks to the office manager at her medical spa and clinic in Las Cruces, N.M. on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. The spa and clinic was previously in El Paso for several years, but moved to Las Cruces in October and currently has six employees.
Nurse practitioner Christina Blanco speaks to the office manager at her medical spa and clinic in Las Cruces, N.M. on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. The spa and clinic was previously in El Paso for several years, but moved to Las Cruces in October and currently has six employees.

Despite Changes, Nurses Push for More Independence

Although Texas lawmakers loosened physician supervision requirements for advanced practice nurses in the 2013 legislative session, some health providers argue they should have allowed them to practice independently, too.

March 6th, 2012: Protest against Texas lawmakers decision regarding changed to the  the Women's Health Program. the federal government is expected to cut funding for the program because Texas improperly excluded Planned Parenthood from its list of providers
March 6th, 2012: Protest against Texas lawmakers decision regarding changed to the the Women's Health Program. the federal government is expected to cut funding for the program because Texas improperly excluded Planned Parenthood from its list of providers

"Obamacare" on Center Stage

Texas Weekly

From contraception and cancer screenings to "Obamacare" and state physician shortages, here's a look at the month ahead in Texas health policy. 

Dr. Javier Saenz with a patient, Elena Chavez, 73. Chavez is part of the 50 percent of patients Saenz sees who draw from both Medicare and Medicaid.
Dr. Javier Saenz with a patient, Elena Chavez, 73. Chavez is part of the 50 percent of patients Saenz sees who draw from both Medicare and Medicaid.

State Cuts Squeezing Elderly Poor and Their Doctors

After the state reduced its share of co-payments for Texans who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, doctors who treat such patients are seeing revenue disruptions.