Tribpedia: Secession Controversy

The secession controversy refers to the fallout from Gov. Rick Perry's remarks that hinted Texas could secede from the Union. The remarks were made at a tax day rally in April 2009 in Austin.

Perry said he thought the U.S. was still a "great union," but also said, "if Washington continues to thumb their nose at the American ...

Republican State Reps. (l to r) Jimmie Don Aycock, R-Killeen; James White, R-Woodville, Bryan Hughes, R-Marshall,; and Jim Pitts, R-Waxahachie, work on HB4 budget amendments on March 31, 2011.
Republican State Reps. (l to r) Jimmie Don Aycock, R-Killeen; James White, R-Woodville, Bryan Hughes, R-Marshall,; and Jim Pitts, R-Waxahachie, work on HB4 budget amendments on March 31, 2011.

Bill Seeks Study on Effects of Cutting Federal Funds to State

State Rep. James White, R-Hillister, has filed legislation that would require the state to study the effects of cutting financial ties with the federal government. The bill is not intended as a call for secession, White said.

A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.
A coalition of Tea Party groups rally against President Obama on Jan. 16, 2009, at the Texas Capitol.

Texas Won't Secede — But It Won't Shut Up Either

Texas leaders aren't talking about secession, after an outbreak of conversation a couple of years ago. But the germ of the idea remains in the anti-federalist talking points that fueled Gov. Rick Perry’s re-election campaign last year and provided the outline for his book, Fed Up!

Sam Houston, Texas Secession — and Robert E. Lee

No secession ball will mark the day. But 150 years ago today, on Feb. 1, 1861, a state convention voted overwhelmingly to secede from the Union, against the fervent wishes of Gov. Sam Houston. Caught in the mess was one Robert E. Lee, a federal officer in what had become a rebel state.

Signs of Discontent

Texans gathered for a "nullification" rally at the Texas Capitol on Saturday, January 16, in protest of federal healthcare plans in particular and federal spending and laws in general. They called on the state government to "nullify" what they contend are unconstitutional actions by the federal government — that is, to opt out of pending healthcare legislation and other federal programs and laws they feel go beyond the bounds of the U.S. Constitution. Most of the photographs that follow were taken by Bob Daemmrich; a few were shot by Ross Ramsey.

Pleading the Tenth

The final amendment in the Bill of Rights provides state leaders their best avenue around federal policies they don't agree with. That is, if the Tenth Amendment actually means something.