Tribpedia: Scott Hochberg

TribLive: A Conversation About School Finance

On April 19, I talked with former House Public Education Committee chairmen Rob Eissler and Kent Grusendorf, former vice chairman Scott Hochberg and attorney David Thompson about the perennially unresolved question of how the state should fund public education. Our conversation was co-presented by the Center for Politics and Governance at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin.

State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, speaks to the press about two school finance measures filed on March 8, 2011
State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, speaks to the press about two school finance measures filed on March 8, 2011

Updated: The 2012 Quit List

So far, 27 26 members of the Texas House, four members of the Texas Senate, three State Board of Education members and two U.S. congressmen have said they won't seek re-election.

Sophomore student Miguel Nava works on a science experiment at the San Juan Idea Public Schools Tuesday morning in San Juan, Texas November 23, 2010.
Sophomore student Miguel Nava works on a science experiment at the San Juan Idea Public Schools Tuesday morning in San Juan, Texas November 23, 2010.

Judgment Day

There's a day in July that school districts eye with a mixture of anticipation and dread. This year, it's on the 29th, when the Texas Education Agency will publicly release the accountability ratings for the state's more than 1,000 districts.

Commissioner of Higher Education Dr. Raymund Paredes sits in the Senate gallery awaiting the end of the session on May 30, 2011.
Commissioner of Higher Education Dr. Raymund Paredes sits in the Senate gallery awaiting the end of the session on May 30, 2011.

Outcomes-Based Higher Ed Funding Seems Right — But Which Outcomes?

During the regular session, Gov. Rick Perry’s top legislative priority for higher education was the implementation of a new financing system that rewards universities for graduating more students, not just for getting students into classes. Why didn't that happen?

Late Homework

The deadline for approving bills in the House came and went this week without a vote on Rep. Scott Hochberg's school finance legislation. Meanwhile, in the upper chamber, Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano, is struggling to find one more Democrat to get her proposal heard.

State Rep. Dennis Bonnen (L), R-Angleton, has words with state Rep. Rob Eissler, R-The Woodlands, during debate on Eissler's HB500 on April 6, 2011.
State Rep. Dennis Bonnen (L), R-Angleton, has words with state Rep. Rob Eissler, R-The Woodlands, during debate on Eissler's HB500 on April 6, 2011.

House Passes Controversial School Testing Bill [Updated]

A bill from state Rep. Rob Eissler modifying how end-of-course exams factor into graduation led House Republicans into a debate over how best to handle student testing during what one called "extraordinary times" in public education.

State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, at the 2010 Texas Democratic Convention in Corpus Christi.
State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, at the 2010 Texas Democratic Convention in Corpus Christi.

House Committee Tackles School Finance

On the heels of a newly approved House budget that leaves public schools $7.8 billion short of what they're entitled to under current funding formulas, the House Public Education Committee today considered a round of school finance bills.

State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, discusses the details of two school finance measures on March 8, 2011.
State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, discusses the details of two school finance measures on March 8, 2011.

What $9.8 Billion in Public School Cuts Looks Like

School districts won't know exactly what nearly $10 billion in state cuts means to them until lawmakers pass a new school finance bill. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune takes a look at the first bill of the session that gives districts an idea of what to expect.

State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, speaks to the press about two school finance measures filed on March 8, 2011
State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, speaks to the press about two school finance measures filed on March 8, 2011

What $9.8 Billion in Public School Cuts Looks Like

School districts won't know exactly what nearly $10 billion in state cuts means to them until lawmakers pass a new school finance bill. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune takes a look at the first bill of the session that gives districts an idea of what to expect.

Crowded classroom in Edgewood School District, San Antonio, TX
Crowded classroom in Edgewood School District, San Antonio, TX

School's Out

The budget shortfall — estimated to be as much as $28 billion — will require the Legislature to take a paring knife and possibly a machete to government agencies and programs. The largest single consumer of state dollars is public education, so it’s hard to imagine a scenario in which funding for teacher salaries, curricular materials and the like isn’t on the chopping block, especially if lawmakers want to make good on their promises of no new taxes. But where is that money going to come from? 

Robert Scott, the commissioner of the Texas Education Agency, at a State Board of Education meeting on Sept. 24, 2010.
Robert Scott, the commissioner of the Texas Education Agency, at a State Board of Education meeting on Sept. 24, 2010.

TribBlog: No-Show Ed Commish Peeves Legislators

Texas Education Commissioner Robert Scott's absence from joint hearing at the Capitol today left some lawmakers annoyed.

Faking the Grade

Last school year, the Texas Education Agency implemented a new “growth measure” purported to reward schools for improving student performance — even if they still fail state tests. The effect on state accountability ratings was immediate and dramatic: The number of campuses considered “exemplary” by the state doubled, to 2,158. But a new analysis shows the projections of future student success may be wrong as much as half the time.