Tribpedia: Redistricting

Redistricting is the revision or replacement of existing representative districts. It results in new districts with different "lines" or geographical boundaries. The purpose of redistricting is to equalize population in state and congressional districts after publication of the United States census, and to ensure that minority populations are considered. 

Redistricting in Texas is mandated by the Texas Constitution of ...

Pasadena, a voting rights battleground, prepares for pivotal elections

Oscar Del Toro, who lost a Pasadena City Council race for an at-large seat in 2015, and is running again this year, points to the city's redistricting map. 
<p>Oscar Del Toro, who lost a Pasadena City Council race for an at-large seat in 2015, and is running again this year, points to the city's redistricting map.&nbsp;</p>

After having its city council districts declared discriminatory, the city of Pasadena is preparing for May elections that could have statewide implications. This blue-collar Harris County city, whose representation has long lagged its majority-Hispanic population, is seeing significant attention and resources from both parties.

Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, and former Texas Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer speak to reporters on April 27, 2017, following a status conference on a years-long challenge to Texas' political maps.&nbsp;
<p>Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, and former Texas Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer speak to reporters on April 27, 2017, following a status conference on a years-long challenge to Texas' political maps.&nbsp;</p>

Ahead of 2018, trial likely looms in Texas political map battle

“I think the trial is certain,” said Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, a lead plaintiff in the years-long challenge of the state’s political boundaries.

Voters line up before an early voting station opens in Houston early Monday morning, October 24, 2016. Poll workers said the lines are much longer than normal for early voting.
Voters line up before an early voting station opens in Houston early Monday morning, October 24, 2016. Poll workers said the lines are much longer than normal for early voting.

Analysis: A word about where Texas legislators get their legal advice

The state of Texas has been on a losing streak when it comes to redistricting and voter ID laws, with federal judges repeatedly finding that the state intentionally discriminated against minorities. Whose legal advice were they following?

Tatiana Suriano (center) and Mario Carrillo (right) of Voto Latino demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Dec. 8, 2015, before a Congressional Hispanic Caucus news conference on the Evenwel v. Abbott case. The case dealt with a challenge to how Texas' legislative districts are drawn.
Tatiana Suriano (center) and Mario Carrillo (right) of Voto Latino demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Dec. 8, 2015, before a Congressional Hispanic Caucus news conference on the Evenwel v. Abbott case. The case dealt with a challenge to how Texas' legislative districts are drawn.

Analysis: In Texas Case, Supreme Court Rules Nonvoters are People, Too

In a ruling on political redistricting this week, the U.S. Supreme Court made an argument for equal representation from legislators even if that means voters don't get an equal say in electing them. 

Mario Carrillo (left) and Avery Lord, both of Voto Latino, held a sign ahead of a Congressional Hispanic Caucus prepares press conference in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 8, 2015. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments that day in the Evenwel v. Abbott case.
Mario Carrillo (left) and Avery Lord, both of Voto Latino, held a sign ahead of a Congressional Hispanic Caucus prepares press conference in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 8, 2015. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments that day in the Evenwel v. Abbott case.

U.S. Supreme Court Hears Texas Redistricting Case

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday over a Texas case that sought to clarify what “one person, one vote” means in American politics.