Tribpedia: Oil And Natural Gas

For more than 100 years, Texas has been one of the nation’s key producers of oil and natural gas. After the discovery of the Spindletop oil field in 1901, oil production in the state increased at a rapid rate, reaching a peak in 1972. According to the Energy Information Administration, Texas was producing 3.4 million barrels a day at its height. Since then, production has decreased substantially, with current production levels down to one-third of their level in 1972. Despite declining production, the oil extracted in Texas, known as West Texas Intermediate (WTI), is considered to be of high quality. Texas’s 27 petroleum refineries account for one-fourth of total U.S. refining capacity and process 4.7 million barrels of crude oil daily.  

Additionally, Texas leads the nation in the production of natural gas, producing nearly one third of the nation’s yearly supply. Gas production also peaked in 1972, and production declined to three-fifths of peak levels by 2005. But production has increased since then and has reached nearly four-fifths of the 1972 peak. Texas also leads the nation in consumption of natural gas, accounting for approximately 20 percent of total U.S. consumption.

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Road crews are prolific in the Midland region following the recent oil boom, when heavy truck traffic obliterated highways.
Edward Roper, a homeless man with a mental disability, said his disability check won't cover rent and utilities in Midland because they are too high. Barbara Mamoulides, chairwoman of the local Salvation Army, said the organization has seen more of an increase in requests for food and help with utility bills than it has in homelessness, but she said that could change this summer “as people have been without work longer and they try to run their air conditioners and run up an electric bill they can’t pay.”
One day after Perryton's June 1987 celebration of rising oil prices, devastating winds tore apart the Vela family mobile home, killing 18-month-old Elizabeth DeAnn Vela. The family dog stands guard over the wreckage. Nick Long, who masterminded the celebration in Perryton when the price of oil rose above $20 a barrel in 1987, is now an insurance agent in Floydada, and will soon run radio station KZZN in Littlefield, Texas. May 16, 2016. Kiki Shaw, executive director of the Perryton-Ochiltree Chamber of Commerce, holds a framed copy of a Popular Mechanics story that discusses Perryton's origin. May 16, 2016. Stone welcoming sign on US Highway 83 at the north end of town in Perryton, Texas, May 16, 2016. A sign opposing the Trans-Pecos pipeline hangs in a neighborhood near where the pipeline could run near Alpine. A general view of the landscape near where the Trans-Pecos pipeline is believed could run near Alpine. Alpine Mayor Avinash Rangra discusses his opposition to the Trans Pecos Pipeline during a June protest. The Alpine City Council has asked the Obama administration to deny Energy Transfer Partners' permit application to cross the Texas-Mexico border. A home in a neighborhood near where the pipeline is planned to run outside of Alpine . The sun sets in a neighborhood near where the proposed Trans-Pecos pipeline is planned to run outside of Alpine. Locals protest the proposed pipeline in downtown Alpine. In some weeks, the protests  have drawn dozens of residents. A view of Alpine residents protesting the pipeline on June 19, 2015. Locals protest the proposed Trans Pecos Pipeline in downtown Alpine, Texas in mid June. With a population of 6,054, Alpine is the only incorporated city in Brewster County, which is the state’s most spacious county and bigger than all of Connecticut. The city is home to Sul Ross University. An aerial photograph of the Big Bend region near Alpine, where the proposed pipeline will run, stirring concerns among landowners and environmentalists in the largely untouched region. David Keller, an archaeologist at Sul Ross State University and head of the Big Bend Conservation Alliance, looks over the Big Bend region near Alpine, where the proposed Trans-Pecos pipeline will run. Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners plans to start construction in early 2016. An aerial photograph of the Big Bend region near Alpine, where opposition to the proposed Trans-Pecos pipeline has grown since residents first learned of the project, which will send huge amounts of gas into Mexico. A sign opposing the Trans-Pecos pipeline is shown outside the home of Suzanne Bailey and Tom Short in Alpine in June 2015. Their house sits a few feet from one of the first visible signs that the pipeline is coming: a 23-acre lot that's set to be a staging area for segments of the pipeline. The couple complained of frequent loud noise and shaking of their home as heavy machinery works to smooth the land. A hydraulic fracturing site in Fort Worth on Sept. 27, 2013. Fracking in Fort Worth, Sept. 27, 2013 Fracking in Fort Worth, Sept. 27, 2013 Attendees filled the Alexander Convention Center on Tuesday evening for a Texas Department of Transportation hearing in Cotulla, TX on their controversial plan to convert some paved roads to gravel to save money on maintenance. A recently installed, working pump jack sits near wind turbines in the Cline Shale region, near Maryneal south of Sweetwater. Brian Schoonover with Water Rescue Services holding a jar of produced water. A rig worker inspects casings that will be loaded into the well in preparation for the hydraulic fracturing process at a Chesapeake Energy drill site in Dimmit, Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale. Trucks carry cement that will be mixed to fill the space between multiple layers of casing in preparation for the hydraulic fracturing process at a Chesapeake Energy drill site in Dimmit, Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale. A worker waits to load a piece of pipe, or casing, that will be lowered into the well at a Chesapeake Energy drill site in Dimmit County, Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale. Casings are lined up to be loaded into the well in preparation for the hydraulic fracturing process at a Chesapeake Energy drill site in Dimmit, Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale.

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