The Politics of Prevention

The Politics of Prevention is an occasional series on the effects of state policy on women's health services.

Todd Wiseman

Appeals Court: Texas Can Enforce Strict Abortion Rules for Now

As it hears arguments in an appeal of a federal judge’s decision overturning new requirements for Texas abortion facilities, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that the state could enforce the requirements in the meantime. That means eight or fewer abortion clinics in Texas will be able to stay open. 

 

 

 

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Lawmakers Push to Consolidate Women's Health Programs

Three years after slashing family planning funding, lawmakers have created new programs to restore access to care. Now they want to consolidate those programs to improve access to family planning, cancer screenings and other health services for the state’s poorest women. Critics say more changes are the last thing Texas' embattled women's health system needs. 

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Interactive: Track 2014 State Spending on Primary Care for Women

In an effort to rebuild the state’s women’s health infrastructure following the cuts they made in 2011, Texas lawmakers in 2013 added $100 million to the budget to expand primary health care services for women in the 2014-15 biennium. Use this interactive to see how much the state has awarded individual regions for 2014, the percentage of that money expected to be spent on family planning and the total anticipated clients.

 

 

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Tamir Kalifa

Providers, Patients Face Obstacles in Women's Health Program

To replace Planned Parenthood clinics, state health officials have recruited physician groups to participate in the Women's Health Program. But unlike family planning clinics, physician groups generally don't have the funding to provide low-income women with the free or subsidized services that aren't covered by the state-run program. 

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Stephen Spillman

Claims Drop Under New Women's Health Program

To stop Planned Parenthood from receiving public financing, Texas’ Republican leaders gambled that the state could operate the Women's Health Program without tens of millions of federal dollars annually. But with the exclusion of roughly 40 Planned Parenthood clinics from the program in 2013, records show claims for birth control and wellness exams dropped, as did enrollment numbers.

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Chris Wilkinson / Todd Wiseman

Report: Latinas Struggle to Access Reproductive Care

The closure of nine of 32 family planning clinics in the Rio Grande Valley has compounded the struggles of low-income, Latina women trying to access reproductive health services, according to a report released Tuesday by the Center for Reproductive Health and the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health.

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Todd Wiseman / Callie Richmond

5th Circuit Reverses Ruling on Abortion Bill

Texas abortion providers’ Monday victory was short-lived. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday reversed a federal district court ruling that found part of the state's new abortion regulations unconstitutional, meaning the provisions of House Bill 2 could take effect immediately if state officials choose to enforce them.

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Todd Wiseman / Callie Richmond

Court Battle Begins Over New Abortion Regulations

A federal judge began hearing arguments Monday as abortion rights advocates pursue a preliminary injunction to block the implementation of two provisions in the state's new law on abortion regulations. Plaintiffs argued that the law violates the constitutional rights of women, and the state’s attorneys defended Texas’ right to enact laws that advance protections for the life of a fetus.

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Michael Stravato

Advocates' Suit Targets Abortion Restrictions

The next stage in abortion rights advocates’ efforts to block implementation of strict new regulations on the procedure in Texas began on Friday, as the Center for Reproductive Rights, the American Civil Liberties Union and a group of abortion providers across the state filed a lawsuit in federal court.

 

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