Throughout Mental Health Month in May, The Texas Tribune is partnering with the Mental Health Channel and KLRU to focus on some of Texas’ biggest challenges in providing mental health care. This series features a mix of traditional Tribune reporting, a panel discussion hosted by KLRU, deep-dive reporting videos and a PBS special that will be aired nationwide. Topics of coverage include hurdles specific communities face and their workarounds, mental health in our school system, veterans and mental health, and mental health and the criminal justice system.

Bari Greenwood, who adopted her daughter after she was removed from her biological parents by Child Protective Services, stands at the Rees-Jones Center for Foster Care in Plano, Texas, May 4, 2016. Greenwood and her family received services at the center.
Bari Greenwood, who adopted her daughter after she was removed from her biological parents by Child Protective Services, stands at the Rees-Jones Center for Foster Care in Plano, Texas, May 4, 2016. Greenwood and her family received services at the center.

For Foster Kids, a Push to Ensure Medical Care Treats Psychological Pain

State officials hope a new network of clinics will better connect foster children with trauma-informed behavioral health care.

Supporting Workers and Their Mental Health

Mental illness is a leading cause of disability in the U.S., resulting in absenteeism, diminished productivity and increased turnover. In this segment of in this episode of Mental Health Matters, we look at several legislative and employer-based policies that strive to support workers and strengthen businesses and the economy.

The Austin State Hospital is shown on April 29, 2016. Despite an infusion of funding from lawmakers for the state’s mental health care system, Texas struggles to provide psychiatric care for all patients who need it.
The Austin State Hospital is shown on April 29, 2016. Despite an infusion of funding from lawmakers for the state’s mental health care system, Texas struggles to provide psychiatric care for all patients who need it.

State Spending More on Mental Health Care, but Waitlist Grows

Texas lawmakers tout recent improvements to the state’s mental health safety net, citing new funding and program expansions. But the state still struggles to provide psychiatric care for all patients who need it.