Ethics Explorer A Guide to the Financial Interests of Elected Officials

Rep. Tracy King District 80 (D-Batesville)

Industry
Business Owner, Real Estate, Ranching/Agriculture, Oil & Gas
Education
B.S., Texas A&M University
Spouse
Cheryl
Committees
  • Select Committee on Texas Ports, Innovation & Infrastructure
  • Natural Resources
  • Agriculture & Livestock (Chair)
Financial Statements

Sources of Income

  • His company, King Investments, is a Uvalde-based ranching and oil business. King Investments also manages rental properties.

  • According to his 2014 personal financial statement, King’s stock holdings include Apple, BP PLC Spons ADR, Chesapeake Energy Corp., Guggenheim Funds Dist., General Electric Co., Ishares Tr Global 100, Sprott Physical Gold ET Trust, Ishares Silver Trust, Seventy Seven Energy, AT&T Inc., United States Natural Gas LP ETF, WalMart Stores, Yum Brands, Exxon Mobil Corp., and Heritage Bancorp. He has also invested in several bonds and mutual funds. 

  • He holds certificates of deposit at several different banks as well as real estate notes on two properties in Uvalde and another in Carrizo Springs.

  • He receives royalties from the Murphy Exploration Company in El Dorado, Arkansas

Property

  • 30 properties in Uvalde and Medina counties valued at $1,652,836 

     

  • 20 acres in Dimmit County valued at $70,000.

Analysis

  • King has received money from the Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas ($12,500 as of Nov. 14, 2012) and authored a few bills (most recently HJR 113 in 2011, which did not pass) that would authorize gaming conducted by the tribe. The tribe has land in King's district, in Maverick County.

  • The Texas Hearing Aid Association (of which King, who was in the hearing aid business for nearly 25 years, is a volunteer past president) is one of his biggest donors — as of Nov. 14, 2012, he was the only lawmaker it had given money to ($18,750). In 2009 he authored a related law, HB 594, that altered and clarified some licensing requirements for hearing aid dispensers. King said he had already sold his own hearing-aid business when he introduced the bill.