Jim Malewitz

Jim Malewitz primarily covers energy and the environment for the Tribune. Before arriving in 2013, he covered those issues for Stateline, a nonprofit news service in Washington, D.C. The Michigan native majored in political science at Grinnell College in Iowa and holds a master’s from the University of Iowa. There, he helped launch the nonprofit Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism, where he currently serves on the board of directors. Jim also coaches the Texas Tribune Runoffs, which, sources say, is the scrappiest coed newsroom softball team west of the Mississippi.

Recent Contributions

Paul Hobby Wants Off Ethics Commission

The University of Texas System’s Houston Advisory Task Force, Carin Barth, left, and Paul Hobby, right, during a press conference in Houston Monday, June 13, 2016 reguarding plans for the 300 acres it has purchased in southwest Houston.
The University of Texas System’s Houston Advisory Task Force, Carin Barth, left, and Paul Hobby, right, during a press conference in Houston Monday, June 13, 2016 reguarding plans for the 300 acres it has purchased in southwest Houston.
Texas Weekly

Also, former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller has left the company behind the Texas Clean Energy Project, the "clean coal" power plant projected to be built in West Texas.

Texas Gets Boost in New Mexico Water Fight

The Rio Grande at the New Mexico-Texas border on Monday, December 9, 2013 in El Paso.
The Rio Grande at the New Mexico-Texas border on Monday, December 9, 2013 in El Paso.

Three years after Texas filed a complaint in the U.S. Supreme Court alleging that New Mexican farmers were illegally curbing the Rio Grande's flow into Texas, the justices appear closer to taking up the challenge. 

 

Sinkhole Warnings Don't Faze West Texas

Wink Sink No. 2 formed in 2002 around a well that once supplied water for drillers on the the Hendrick Oilfield. The larger of Winkler County's two sinkholes, it measures 900 feet across at its widest point.
Wink Sink No. 2 formed in 2002 around a well that once supplied water for drillers on the the Hendrick Oilfield. The larger of Winkler County's two sinkholes, it measures 900 feet across at its widest point.

A recent study has thrust the Wink Sinks — two breathtaking sinkholes in Winkler County which have long been objects of fear and fascination — into the national spotlight. 

State Might Let Homeowners Sign Away Right to Sue Insurers

Texas Commissioner of Insurance David Mattax listens to advocates and insurance industry representatives during a public hearing on arbitration clauses for homeowner's insurance on July 6, 2016.
Texas Commissioner of Insurance David Mattax listens to advocates and insurance industry representatives during a public hearing on arbitration clauses for homeowner's insurance on July 6, 2016.

Texas Insurance Commissioner David Mattax heard public testimony Wednesday on whether his department should allow insurers to offer lower rates for homeowners who agree to settle disputes through a mandatory mediation-arbitration process — effectively signing away their right to sue.

A Closer Look at the Texas Twist in Fight Between Exxon, Virgin Islands

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton testifies how his faith is getting him through his recent legal woes during a speech to a gathering at the Republican Party of Texas gathering in Dallas May 14, 2016.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton testifies how his faith is getting him through his recent legal woes during a speech to a gathering at the Republican Party of Texas gathering in Dallas May 14, 2016.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is trying to intervene in an effort to thwart an investigation into whether Exxon Mobil misled investors about the risks of climate change. Here’s a guide to Paxton’s effort and how it fits into the much broader climate change battle in the United States.

Texas Budget Spared in Court Ruling on Drilling Tax Case

An oil driller had filed a lawsuit over sales tax refunds. Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar's office warned that a Texas loss could have spurred up to $4.4 billion in refund filings for 2017 alone.
An oil driller had filed a lawsuit over sales tax refunds. Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar's office warned that a Texas loss could have spurred up to $4.4 billion in refund filings for 2017 alone.

A Texas Supreme Court ruling has spared the state from having to issue billions of dollars in tax refunds to oil and gas drillers — a prospect that had threatened to shake up the next legislative session.