Jim Malewitz

Jim Malewitz covers energy for the Tribune. Before arriving, he spent two years covering energy and environmental issues for Stateline, a nonprofit news service in Washington, D.C., where his work also appeared in The Washington Post and Chicago Tribune, among other newspapers. A native of Michigan, Jim has an undergraduate degree from Grinnell College in Iowa, where he played varsity baseball. He also holds a master’s from the University of Iowa, where he helped launch the nonprofit Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism. Jim loves tacos and barbecue, making him a good match for Austin’s eating scene. However, he remains on the lookout for great waffles.

Recent Contributions

Gov. Abbott Makes First International Visit to Mexico

Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs José Antonio Meade Kuribreña shakes hands with Gov. Greg Abbott during a meeting at the governor's mansion in Austin on July 9, 2015.
Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs José Antonio Meade Kuribreña shakes hands with Gov. Greg Abbott during a meeting at the governor's mansion in Austin on July 9, 2015.
Texas Weekly

The visit, intended to bolster economic and cultural ties between Texas and Mexico, was prompted by an invite from the Mexican foreign affairs secretary during a visit to Austin in July.

Cuellar: House Will Pass Bill Lifting Crude Export Ban

U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Laredo) speaks with state Rep. Doug Miller R-New Braunfels, during a visit to the Texas Capitol on Feb. 19, 2013.
U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Laredo) speaks with state Rep. Doug Miller R-New Braunfels, during a visit to the Texas Capitol on Feb. 19, 2013.

A Texas Democrat says he believes the U.S. House will pass legislation lifting the country’s 40-year-old ban on most crude oil exports — even amid a frenzy of activity in the upcoming session.

 

Well Explosion Could Put Pressure on Texas Regulators

Ashley and Cody Murray, ranchers in Palo Pinto County, pose with their two children. They allege nearby gas drilling caused methane to leak into their water well before it exploded, severely burning the couple, their four-year-old daughter and Cody's father. Their legal case could put pressure on Texas regulators.
Ashley and Cody Murray, ranchers in Palo Pinto County, pose with their two children. They allege nearby gas drilling caused methane to leak into their water well before it exploded, severely burning the couple, their four-year-old daughter and Cody's father. Their legal case could put pressure on Texas regulators.

A Palo Pinto County family is suing two oil and gas operators, alleging that gas from their wells migrated into the family's water well, which exploded and burned them. While the Texas Railroad Commission has been quietly investigating over the past year, the family's attorney said he has gathered concrete evidence to prove his case.