Annie Daniel Designer/Developer

Annie Daniel joined The Texas Tribune in 2014 shortly after graduating from UNC Chapel Hill where she studied both multimedia journalism and political science. Before moving to Texas, Annie interned at The Washington Post on their graphics team. She is now a proud member of the Tribune’s interactive data & visuals team where she develops interactives, analyzes datasets and creates graphics.

Recent Contributions

Sharp Drop in Abortions Followed Texas Restrictions

Lara Chelian, center, and her mother, Renee Chelian, both abortion providers from Michigan, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside on March 2, 2016. The case is focused on the Texas law known as House Bill 2.
Lara Chelian, center, and her mother, Renee Chelian, both abortion providers from Michigan, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside on March 2, 2016. The case is focused on the Texas law known as House Bill 2.

The number of drug-induced abortions in Texas plummeted in the first full year after the state's strict 2013 abortion law took effect, according to statistics released Thursday by the Texas Department of State Health Services. 

Texas Suburbs Among Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities

Georgetown — north of Austin — is the nation's fastest-growing city among those with populations greater than 50,000, according to new census data.
Georgetown — north of Austin — is the nation's fastest-growing city among those with populations greater than 50,000, according to new census data.

Big Texas cities continue to add the greatest number of people, but the action is in the suburbs when it comes to rates of growth. Led by Georgetown, Texas has four of the nation's 10 fastest-growing cities.

Five Texas Counties Rejected Clinton Twice, Eight Years Apart

Hillary Clinton greets supporters at Texas Southern University in Houston Saturday, February 20, 2016, after winning the Nevada caucus.
Hillary Clinton greets supporters at Texas Southern University in Houston Saturday, February 20, 2016, after winning the Nevada caucus.

Hillary Clinton ran for president in a Texas Democratic primary in 2008, winning most of the counties in the state. Eight years later, she did it again. We’ve mapped the results to show where she was consistently strong and weak.