Gov. Rick Perry and Comptroller Susan Combs threw out a slew of endorsements this primary season. Perry also hit the campaign trail with more GOP candidates than he could count on both hands. Some politicos say success or failure with endorsements is a testament to how well a politician can read the political atmosphere across the state and the level of support the politician could gather for a potential run for re-election. So, how well did the governor and comptroller do? 

The table below shows which candidates Perry backed and the outcome of their primary races:

Rick Perry's GOP Primary Endorsements
RaceCandidateOutcome
President Mitt Romney Won, secured the GOP presidential nomination
U.S. Senate David Dewhurst Headed to a runoff with Ted Cruz
U.S. Congress Randy Weber Headed to a runoff with Felicia Harris
U.S. Senate, Minnesota Pete Hegseth Lost to Rep. Kurt Bills, endorsed by Rep. Ron Paul
Texas Supreme Court, Place 2 Don Willett Won, Libertarian opponent in general election
SD-5 Charles Schwertner Won, Libertarian opponent in general election
SD-9 Kelly Hancock Won, faces opposition in general election
SD-11 Larry Taylor Won, Democratic opponent in general election
HD-2 Dan Flynn Won, no opponent in general election
HD-43 J.M. Lozano Headed to a runoff with Bill Wilson II
HD-88 Jim Landtroop Headed to runoff with Ken King
HD-9 Wayne Christian Lost to Chris Paddie
HD-6 Leo Berman Lost to Matt Schaefer
HD-15 Rob Eissler Lost to Steve Toth
HD-57 Marva Beck Lost to Trent Ashby
HD-19 James White Won, no opponent in general election
HD-64 Myra Crownover Won, faces opposition in general election
HD-97 Craig Goldman Won, Democratic opponent in general election
HD-136 Tony Dale Won, faces opposition in general election
HD-5 Bryan Hughes Won, no opponent in general election
HD-10 Jim Pitts Won, no opponent in general election
HD-55 Ralph Sheffield Won, no opponent in general election
HD-83 Charles Perry Won, no opponent in general election
HD-96 Bill Zedler Won, Libertarian opponent in general election
Williamson County District Attorney John Bradley Lost to Jana Duty

 

Most of the candidates Perry endorsed — such as Rep. Bryan Hughes, who recently announced his intention to challenge Rep. Joe Straus for House speaker — succeeded in the primary, but not all.

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When the primary vote counting ended, Perry renewed his support for Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, who faces former Solicitor General Ted Cruz in a GOP runoff for the U.S. Senate seat held by Kay Bailey Hutchison. Other candidates Perry endorsed, like Rep. J.M. Lozano of Kingsville, who recently switched political parties, Rep. Jim Landtroop of Plainview and Rep. Randy Weber of Pearland, who is vying for a seat in the U.S. Congress, are headed to July 31 runoffs. 

Three long-standing incumbents who received nods from the governor — Rep. Leo Berman of Tyler, Rep. Wayne Christian of Center, Rep. Rob Eissler of The Woodlands and Rep. Marva Beck of Centerville — lost their seats. And despite Perry’s support for Williamson County District Attorney John Bradley, whom Perry had appointed chairman of the Forensic Science Commission, Bradley’s involvement in the Michael Morton case proved to be destructive to his re-election campaign.

Ultimately, the majority of the candidates endorsed by Perry won, like Rep. Charles Schwertner, a Senate hopeful whose primary election party was attended by the governor. Facing a Libertarian opponent in the general election, Schwertner aims to succeed Sen. Steve Ogden in staunchly Republican SD-5. Rep. James White, whom Perry endorsed over Straus ally Rep. Mike “Tuffy” Hamilton, was also victorious. 

On the national front, Mitt Romney, a onetime campaign rival of Perry's, clinched the GOP presidential nomination Tuesday with Perry's backing. After bowing out of the presidential race in January, Perry had endorsed Newt Gingrich, but he switched his endorsement after Gingrich exited the race.

Perry also weighed in on a U.S. Senate race in Minnesota — a race that U.S. Rep. Ron Paul also weighed in on. Perry’s pick — Pete Hegseth, a political newcomer and veteran with the National Guard — came in third, while Paul’s pick, Rep. Kurt Bills, won.

Combs' endorsements this primary season added to the speculation that she'll run for lieutenant governor in 2014. Here's the outcome of her picks: 

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Susan Combs' GOP Primary Endorsements
RaceCandidateOutcome
SD-9 Kelly Hancock Won, faces opposition in general election
HD-43 J.M. Lozano Headed to a runoff with Bill Wilson II
HD-59 Sid Miller Headed to runoff with J.D. Sheffield
HD-88 Jim Landtroop Headed to runoff with Ken King
HD-9 Wayne Christian Lost to Chris Paddie
HD-98 Vicki Truitt Lost to Giovanni Capriglione
HD-93 Barbara Nash Lost to Matt Krause
HD-57 Marva Beck Lost to Trent Ashby
HD-56 Charles "Doc" Anderson Won, Libertarian opponent in general election
HD-8 Byron Cook Won, Democratic opponent in general election
HD-47 Paul D. Workman Won, Democratic opponent in general election
HD-73 Doug Miller Won, Libertarian opponent in general election
HD-5 Bryan Hughes Won, no opponent in general election
HD-18 John Otto Won, no opponent in general election
HD-83 Charles Perry Won, no opponent in general election
HD-10 Jim Pitts Won, no opponent in general election
HD-55 Ralph Sheffield Won, no opponent in general election
HD-7 David Simpson Won, no opponent in general election
HD-19 James E. White Won, no opponent in general election

 

A handful of Combs' picks — including Christian, Beck, Hughes, Landtroop, Perry, Pitts and White — were the same as the governor’s. Early on in the races, Combs’ approval of Rep. David Simpson, the self-proclaimed Constitutionalist and Tea Party favorite, and other staunchly conservative incumbents reinforced speculation that she was prepping for a run for lieutenant governor by associating herself with more conservative values and candidates. 

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