Troubled WatersThe State of Texas Rivers

Six years ago, state leaders launched an effort to better manage the health of Texas' rivers. But environmental advocates fear that ecology still takes a back seat as legislators fret about having enough water to sate Texas' fast-growing cities. Now, every Texas river is threatened by nearly unprecedented drought and the looming effects of climate change. Our series explores the history, health and future of some of Texas' most important and legendary rivers.

Use the interactive map below to view all of the rivers Texas Tribune reporters will write about during the Troubled Waters series. Hover over a river to find the story written about it; if it hasn't been published yet, check back soon. And be sure to visit In the Flow, a co-publication of The Texas Tribune and The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, for more coverage on the state's waterways.

 
The Devils River, which runs through the Dolan Falls Preserve, is known by nature enthusiasts as one of the most pristine rivers in Texas.
The Devils River, which runs through the Dolan Falls Preserve, is known by nature enthusiasts as one of the most pristine rivers in Texas.

Devils River Could Feel Impact of Hunt for Water

Thanks to conservation efforts and its remote location, the Devils River is seen as one of the state's last pristine rivers. But change could be coming for the river, as some are eyeing its basin for new water supplies. 

An official with Fort Worth's water department on steps that lead down to the Trinity River, where unreclaimed water from the wastewater treatment plant gets dumped.
An official with Fort Worth's water department on steps that lead down to the Trinity River, where unreclaimed water from the wastewater treatment plant gets dumped.

Reused Wastewater Key to Trinity River's Survival

By virtue of its proximity to three major Texas cities, nearly half of the state’s population relies on the Trinity River for some of its water needs.