Corrie MacLaggan News Editor

Corrie MacLaggan is the Tribune's news editor. Previously, the Austin native worked as a national correspondent for Reuters, writing and editing stories about Texas and nearby states and overseeing a network of freelance writers. Before joining Reuters, she covered Texas government and politics for the Austin American-Statesman, writing about everything from gubernatorial races to food stamp application backlogs. She spent her first year at the Statesman writing for the newspaper's weekly Spanish-language publication. She has also worked in Mexico City, where she wrote for publications including the Miami Herald's Mexico edition, Latin Trade magazine and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Her first reporting job was at the El Paso Times. Corrie is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she studied journalism and Spanish.

Recent Contributions

Thousands Lose Cars Amid Calls for Loan Restrictions

Tiffany Richardson took out a short-term loan against a Nissan Altima and another against a Toyota 4Runner. Both vehicles were repossessed.
Tiffany Richardson took out a short-term loan against a Nissan Altima and another against a Toyota 4Runner. Both vehicles were repossessed.

State leaders in business-friendly Texas have been reluctant to put new limits on any industry, and a lack of regulation is being acutely felt by the low-income borrowers to whom the payday and auto-title lending industry most often caters.

Veterinary Medicine Lacks Hispanics in Texas, U.S.

Dr. Orlando Garza walks with a dog that was boarding at his animal hospital on Monday in El Paso. Garza has been a practicing veterinarian since 1982.
Dr. Orlando Garza walks with a dog that was boarding at his animal hospital on Monday in El Paso. Garza has been a practicing veterinarian since 1982.

There were 84 Hispanic veterinarians in Texas in 2010, making up less than 2 percent of the state’s 5,728 veterinarians, according to the 2014 book Changing Texas, whose lead author, Steve H. Murdock, is the former state demographer.

 

Midland-Area Housing Crunch Hurts Foster Care Oversight

Child Protective Services caseworker Juan Carlos Pacheco rents a spare bedroom in his childhood friend's home in Odessa. He has also lived in a trailer with five other people and a one-bedroom apartment with six other people. His own family lives in El Paso.
Child Protective Services caseworker Juan Carlos Pacheco rents a spare bedroom in his childhood friend's home in Odessa. He has also lived in a trailer with five other people and a one-bedroom apartment with six other people. His own family lives in El Paso.

The oil boom has brought jobs and prosperity to Midland and Odessa, but it has also driven up housing prices, making it difficult for the Department of Family and Protective Services to hire caseworkers.

 

In Texas, Less Progress on Reducing Teen Pregnancy

Keshawn Johnson, then 20, colored earlier this year with her sons  (l-r) Keenan Mitchell, 20 months, and Kenny Mitchell, 3,  in their home in North Dallas.
Keshawn Johnson, then 20, colored earlier this year with her sons (l-r) Keenan Mitchell, 20 months, and Kenny Mitchell, 3, in their home in North Dallas.

In Texas and across the country, the birth rate among teenagers has declined significantly. But Texas has not fared as well as other states. The Lone Star State has the nation's fifth-highest birth rate among teenagers.

 

Report: 1.2 Million Texas Latinos Expected at Polls

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a location across the street from the University of Texas at Austin campus on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012.
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a location across the street from the University of Texas at Austin campus on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012.

The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund is projecting a 20.4 percent increase in Latino voters in Texas in 2014 compared to 2010.

Texas Considering No Longer Licensing X-Ray Technicians

Dr. Javier Saenz, who has a medical practice in the Rio Grande Valley town of La Joya, prepared his clinic’s X-ray machine in 2012.
Dr. Javier Saenz, who has a medical practice in the Rio Grande Valley town of La Joya, prepared his clinic’s X-ray machine in 2012.

Texas is considering doing away with the licensing of X-ray technicians and 11 other types of health professionals. Some say that would put patients at risk. A Sunset Commission hearing Wednesday is set to address the issue.