Christine Ayala

Christine Ayala Christine Ayala is a Texas Tribune fellow focused on newsletter production, previously a reporting fellow. Before joining the Tribune, Christine interned for the Austin American-Statesman features desk and Dallas Morning News public safety desk. She is a journalism senior at the University of Texas at Austin where she reported and edited for The Daily Texan.

Recent Contributions

The Q&A: Wenwei Xu

Wenwei Xu, a professor and corn breeder based at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Lubbock.
Wenwei Xu, a professor and corn breeder based at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Lubbock.

In this week's Q&A, we interview, Wenwei Xu, a professor and corn breeder based at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Lubbock.

Ed Tech Products for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Dr. Susan Shauger performs a routine eye exam on Josh Fish at Lakeline Vision Source. A bill backed by optometrists to give them more negotiating power with health insurers, could force customers to lose discounts on services outside their insurance policy’s coverage.
Dr. Susan Shauger performs a routine eye exam on Josh Fish at Lakeline Vision Source. A bill backed by optometrists to give them more negotiating power with health insurers, could force customers to lose discounts on services outside their insurance policy’s coverage.

As technology is woven into everyday classroom curricula, innovation has ensured that students with specific needs are not left behind.

Liberia's Last Ebola Patient is Released

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (red) attached and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification).
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (red) attached and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification).

An important milestone was reached when the last person known to have Ebola in Liberia was discharged from medical care earlier this month, just months after the disease caused bodies to pile up in the streets.