Abby Rapoport Contributing Writer

Abby Rapoport served as a writing fellow at the Economic Policy Institute, in Washington, D.C. before coming to Austin. She covered the 2009 legislative session for TEXAS MONTHLY under the tutelage of Paul Burka, the magazine's senior executive. Previously, she blogged for Glamour Magazine and interned at Lapham’s Quarterly. A Williamsburg, Virginia native, she has a degree in history from Grinnell College.

Recent Contributions

New SBOE Member Wants to End Culture Wars

“I was taught evolution, and it didn’t shake my faith in the Almighty whatsoever,” says George Clayton, who pulled off a stunning upset of incumbent Geraldine "Tincy" Miller, R-Dallas, in the GOP primary to win a seat on the State Board of Education. “Should creationism be taught as a counter to evolution? ... No, I don’t think so. I think evolution is in the science book. It should be taught as a science.”

Christian Conservatives Lose Former SBOE Chair

Don McLeroy, a member of the Texas State Board of Education, at the Texas Tribune offices in October.
Don McLeroy, a member of the Texas State Board of Education, at the Texas Tribune offices in October.

The State Board of Education likely won't be quite as much of a Christian Conservative flash point any more. What it will be, however, is anybody’s guess.

Candidates' Final Days Before the Texas Primar

From left to right: Farouk Shami, Bill White, Debra Medina, Kay Bailey Hutchison, and Rick Perry
From left to right: Farouk Shami, Bill White, Debra Medina, Kay Bailey Hutchison, and Rick Perry

Whether or not the outcome of tomorrow's gubernatorial primary is conclusive — whether or not we have a runoff six weeks hence — we can say this with certainty: One of the five main candidates on the ballot will be the next governor of Texas. And this: 40 hours from now, we'll know much more about the state's coming political landscape than we do today. While we bide our time and wait for results, we present these final snapshots of the campaigns as they wound down.

Medina Believes Tea Party Beliefs Will Bring a Win

Republican gubernatorial hopeful Debra Medina's final pitch to her supporters in her roller coaster ride of a primary campaign.

“We’ll do a runoff if we have to," she said Saturday. "I’d like to secure it outright." She paused and smiled. "It will be the upset of the century if that happens."

TxDOT Finds New Way to Help Fund Metroplex Roads

Sensible people in the Metroplex may have given up long ago on Southwest Parkway and State Highway 161, two huge projects first proposed back in the 1960s. Now they're toll roads — one incomplete, one not yet started — and the money to build them may finally be available. There is, of course, a catch.

Five Texas Legislative Primary Races to Watch

In honor of today's kickoff of early voting — a two-week period in which political junkies, committed activists and other go-to-the-head-of-the-class types will line up to cast ballots for their favorite candidates, unable to contain their enthusiasm or anger until March 2 — we present five different installments in our Primary Color series. Brandi Grissom reports on the GOP face-off to take on state Rep. Joe Moody, D-El Paso, in House District 78. Elise Hu tackles the four-way scrum between Republicans in HD-20 hoping to succeed retiring state Rep. Dan Gattis, R-Georgetown. Ross Ramsey asks why a perenially safe incumbent, state Rep. Vicki Truitt, R-Keller, has a fight on her hands this year in HD-98. Abby Rapoport looks at the battle for conservative cred in the race for the District 5 seat on the State Board of Education. And Morgan Smith picks apart the five-way race for the GOP nomination in Congressional District 23 — and the chance to topple U.S. Rep. Ciro Rodriguez, D-San Antonio.

Debra Medina Answers Glenn Beck 9/11 Truther Claim

Governor candidate Debra Medina greets visitors at the Fort Bend County Chamber of Commerce prior to her speech in a heavily Republican area of Houston on Thursday.
Governor candidate Debra Medina greets visitors at the Fort Bend County Chamber of Commerce prior to her speech in a heavily Republican area of Houston on Thursday.

I had wanted to shadow the phenom gubernatorial candidate on the trail since before the first GOP debate, and her handlers told me I could do it on February 11. Little did I know, little did they know, that Glenn Beck's questions about 9/11 "truthers" would turn her campaign upside-down right before my eyes.

Immunization Advocates Prepare to Fight Skeptics

Advocates for vaccination records say a complete registry of shots would help the state navigate major health crises. Opponents say it would jeopardize patient privacy. Lawmakers like the potential cost savings, but they still aren’t sure where they stand.