Ross Ramsey Executive Editor

Ross Ramsey is executive editor and co-founder of The Texas Tribune. Before joining the Tribune, Ross was editor and co-owner of Texas Weekly for 15 years. He did a 28-month stint in government as associate deputy comptroller for policy and director of communications with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Before that, he reported for the Houston Chronicle from its Austin bureau and for the Dallas Times Herald, first on the business desk in Dallas and later as its Austin bureau chief, and worked as a Dallas-based freelance business writer, writing for regional and national magazines and newspapers. Ross got his start in journalism in broadcasting, covering news for radio stations in Denton and Dallas.

Recent Contributions

More than 300 Gubernatorial Appointees Have Expired Terms

Governor Greg Abbott announced an expansion of the Governor’s Commission for Women at the Governor’s Mansion in Austin, TX on Wednesday, March 30th.
Governor Greg Abbott announced an expansion of the Governor’s Commission for Women at the Governor’s Mansion in Austin, TX on Wednesday, March 30th.

Gov. Greg Abbott has made hundreds of appointments since he took office in January 2015, but is still working his way out of a backlog to replace people whose terms expired as long as five years ago.

Analysis: Texas Judge Tweets While Trump Auditions for GOP

Don R. Willett, Justice on the Supreme Court of Texas. He was appointed by Governor Rick Perry on August 24, 2005.
Don R. Willett, Justice on the Supreme Court of Texas. He was appointed by Governor Rick Perry on August 24, 2005.

You already knew about Donald Trump’s reverence for Twitter, but it’s still surprising that a Texas judge known mainly for his funny tweets would land on the Republican presidential candidate’s list of possible U.S. Supreme Court nominees.

Analysis: Selling Ideas to the People Who Influence Texas Lawmakers

The entrance to the 2016 Republican Party of Texas convention at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas.
The entrance to the 2016 Republican Party of Texas convention at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas.

The more prescriptive a party platform becomes, the more it reads like a directive to the Legislature. In Texas, the GOP platform becomes a way to build the kind of grassroots support that can spur action from legislators. That, in turn, attracts lobbyists.

Analysis: The Texas GOP, in Its Own Words

Texas Republicans study the proposed party platform as the debate plays out in Dallas on May 13, 2016.
Texas Republicans study the proposed party platform as the debate plays out in Dallas on May 13, 2016.

It’s not really news that the latest Republican Party of Texas platform has some offbeat ideas in it. That’s always the case. The platform is the state GOP’s biennial gift to political reporters and columnists. But it's also the clearest expression of the GOP's preferences and intentions.

Analysis: A Place at the Table for Two Texas Republicans Under Fire

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (l.) and Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. Both spoke at the state GOP convention in Dallas Texas on May 14, 2016.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (l.) and Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. Both spoke at the state GOP convention in Dallas Texas on May 14, 2016.

The two statewide officials whose halos have slipped got a couple of the least-prominent speaking spots at the Texas GOP convention. They weren’t the stars of this show, but the GOP faithful appear to be giving both the benefit of the doubt.

Analysis: Regardless of 2016 Results, Texas GOP Still Enthralled by Cruz

The Ted Cruz booth at the Republican Party of Texas convention in Dallas was lined with notes to the U.S. senator on May 12, 2016, the week after he bowed out of the presidential race.
The Ted Cruz booth at the Republican Party of Texas convention in Dallas was lined with notes to the U.S. senator on May 12, 2016, the week after he bowed out of the presidential race.

Ted Cruz, for perfectly sound reasons, packed the Republican Party of Texas convention with his own supporters. As of last week, he’s no longer a candidate for president of the United States, but he’s still the favorite here.

Analysis: Whose Texas GOP Is It, Anyway?

Republicans posing with the elephant at the Fort Worth Convention Center on June 5, 2014.
Republicans posing with the elephant at the Fort Worth Convention Center on June 5, 2014.

The Republican Party of Texas’ convention in Dallas gives the heart of the state’s GOP electorate a chance to see their heroes and stars and to figure out — if possible — where the various conservative tribes are going to come together.