Ross Ramsey Executive Editor

Ross Ramsey is executive editor and co-founder of The Texas Tribune. Before joining the Tribune, Ross was editor and co-owner of Texas Weekly for 15 years. He did a 28-month stint in government as associate deputy comptroller for policy and director of communications with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Before that, he reported for the Houston Chronicle from its Austin bureau and for the Dallas Times Herald, first on the business desk in Dallas and later as its Austin bureau chief, and worked as a Dallas-based freelance business writer, writing for regional and national magazines and newspapers. Ross got his start in journalism in broadcasting, covering news for radio stations in Denton and Dallas.

Recent Contributions

Paul Hobby Wants Off Ethics Commission

The University of Texas System’s Houston Advisory Task Force, Carin Barth, left, and Paul Hobby, right, during a press conference in Houston Monday, June 13, 2016 reguarding plans for the 300 acres it has purchased in southwest Houston.
The University of Texas System’s Houston Advisory Task Force, Carin Barth, left, and Paul Hobby, right, during a press conference in Houston Monday, June 13, 2016 reguarding plans for the 300 acres it has purchased in southwest Houston.
Texas Weekly

Also, former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller has left the company behind the Texas Clean Energy Project, the "clean coal" power plant projected to be built in West Texas.

Analysis: Ted Cruz Trumps Bid for Unity at GOP Convention

Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ted Cruz speaks during the third night of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on July 20, 2016.
Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ted Cruz speaks during the third night of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on July 20, 2016.

With his convention speech Wednesday, Ted Cruz has once again declined to follow the crowd. If he runs for president again in 2020, voters will look back at this week as the start of the campaign. His moves represent a big gamble.

Analysis: Cornyn Wants FBI to Open Clinton Files. And Then What?

U.S. Sen John Cornyn details his meeting with Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump during a press conference May 13, 2016 in Dallas
U.S. Sen John Cornyn details his meeting with Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump during a press conference May 13, 2016 in Dallas

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn thinks it would be a great idea to open the FBI’s investigative files on Hillary Clinton. But there's a reason for separating police and prosecutors and courts — and for separating all of them from politics. 

Analysis: Abortion Stats Reveal Texas Lawmakers' True Intentions

Demonstrators celebrated at the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, after the court struck down a Texas law imposing strict abortion regulations.
Demonstrators celebrated at the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, after the court struck down a Texas law imposing strict abortion regulations.

State lawmakers' 2013 abortion regulations — an effort to circumvent what was spelled out over time by the U.S. Supreme Court — would have been easier to defend with some evidence. But that wasn’t part of the sales pitch.

 

Analysis: No Political Benefit if Voters Can't Feel Tax Relief

Sen. Paul Bettencourt, R-Houston, talks with an aide during testimony Dec. 7, 2015 before the Senate Education Committee on teacher-student relationships.
Sen. Paul Bettencourt, R-Houston, talks with an aide during testimony Dec. 7, 2015 before the Senate Education Committee on teacher-student relationships.

Texas lawmakers want to get a leash on property taxes, which requires them to restrain local governments. The local governments point to expensive state government mandates that drive up their costs. It's hard to fix blame, or credit.

Analysis: Anti-Regulation Party in Texas Has a Strong Taste for Rules

An anti-abortion protester demonstrated outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, before the court struck down two key provisions of a Texas abortion law.
An anti-abortion protester demonstrated outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, before the court struck down two key provisions of a Texas abortion law.

Monday's Supreme Court ruling against two key provisions of the state's anti-abortion law was the latest setback for a band of Republicans who abhor regulatory constraints on business but who regularly try to control the behavior of individuals in Texas. 

Analysis: Taking Direct Aim at Legislative Business as Usual

Left: Wendy Davis is shown during her 2013 filibuster in the Texas Senate. Right: U.S. House Democrats staged a sit-in on June 22, 2016, in their bid to pass gun control legislation.
Left: Wendy Davis is shown during her 2013 filibuster in the Texas Senate. Right: U.S. House Democrats staged a sit-in on June 22, 2016, in their bid to pass gun control legislation.

Maybe the overnight sit-in that captured Washington’s attention will keep gun control in the news. House Democrats' effort fell short, but as Wendy Davis showed three years ago in Texas, the end of the spectacle isn’t necessarily the end of the fight.

Analysis: To Every Wing, There is a Season

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are facing off in the 2016 presidential election.
Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are facing off in the 2016 presidential election.

The primaries and runoffs are out of the way. The state conventions are over. The hot arguments that produced the state party platforms have cooled. And the power of the most partisan Republicans and Democrats is ebbing with the season.