Kiah Collier Energy and Environment Reporter

Kiah Collier reports on energy and the environment for the Tribune, where she began working in July 2015. Since graduating from the University of Texas at Austin in 2009 with degrees in philosophy and multimedia journalism, Kiah has reported on government and politics for publications across the state, including the Austin-American Statesman and the Houston Chronicle. A Central Texas native, Kiah began her career at the San Angelo Standard-Times in West Texas, where she covered the city council and 83rd Legislature and won awards for her reporting on the oil-and-gas boom and prolific drought. When she is not reporting the news, Kiah enjoys consuming the news, cooking, exercising and belly laughing with friends and family. She also enjoys spending time with her calico cat, Carol.

Recent Contributions

Boomtown, Flood Town: Unchecked development and the risks for Houston

Aerial shot of downtown Houston from the Montrose neighborhood during the "Tax Day Flood" on April 18, 2016.
Aerial shot of downtown Houston from the Montrose neighborhood during the "Tax Day Flood" on April 18, 2016.

Rapid development continues in Houston, creating some economic gains but also contributing to flood risks. This project, done in partnership with ProPublica, looks at those risks and the debate over what to do.

How will Texas energy — and environment — fare under Trump?

Donald Trump rallies a crowd of veterans at Drake University on Jan. 28, 2016, while other Republican presidential candidates hold a final Des Moines debate prior to the Iowa caucuses.
Donald Trump rallies a crowd of veterans at Drake University on Jan. 28, 2016, while other Republican presidential candidates hold a final Des Moines debate prior to the Iowa caucuses.

President-elect Donald Trump may be seen as a boon for fossil fuels and a burden for renewables. But energy experts and clean energy groups say his victory may not be a win for Texas oil and gas — or a totally bad thing for wind and solar. 

Legislature to Blame for Mexican-American Studies Textbook, Ed Board Members Say

Hispanic activists, advocates and elected officials protested a proposed Mexican-American studies textbook on Tuesday ahead of the Texas Board of Education's first public hearing on the text. Scholars who have reviewed it say it is riddled with factual errors and offensive ethnic stereotypes.
Hispanic activists, advocates and elected officials protested a proposed Mexican-American studies textbook on Tuesday ahead of the Texas Board of Education's first public hearing on the text. Scholars who have reviewed it say it is riddled with factual errors and offensive ethnic stereotypes.

Hispanic advocates, activists and elected officials from across the state on Tuesday called on the Texas Board of Education to reject a proposed Mexican-American studies textbook they blasted as racist.