Abby Livingston — Click for higher resolution staff photos

Abby Livingston joined the Tribune in 2014 as the publication's first Washington Bureau Chief. In this role, she won the 2017 National Press Club Award for Washington Regional Reporting. Previously, she covered political campaigns, House leadership and Congress for Roll Call, the Capitol Hill newspaper. A seventh-generation Texan, Abby graduated from the University of Texas at Austin. She grew up in Fort Worth and has appeared in an episode of "The Bold and The Beautiful." Abby pitched and produced political segments for CNN and worked as an editor for The Hotline, National Journal’s campaign tipsheet. Abby began her journalism career as a desk assistant at NBC News in Washington, working her way up to the political unit, where she researched stories for Nightly News, the Today Show and Meet the Press. In keeping with the Trib’s great history of hiring softball stars, Abby is a three-time MVP (the most in game history —Ed.) for The Bad News Babes, the women’s press softball team that takes on female members of Congress in the annual Congressional Women’s Softball breast cancer charity game.

Recent Contributions

Robert Hart

Presidential Hopefuls Brag Like Texans

Tailoring their presidential pitches to suburban Dallas evangelicals, a half-dozen Republican presidential hopefuls Sunday afternoon stressed their affinity for the Lone Star State, though it’s unlikely all of them will still be running by the time the Texas primary rolls around in March.

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Abby Livingston

House Backs Repeal of Crude Oil Export Ban

A bipartisan team of Texans rounded up an overwhelming majority of U.S. House votes on Friday to back a bill repealing the nation's long-standing ban on exporting domestic crude oil to the international market. But the final House tally wouldn't be enough to overcome a threatened presidential veto.

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Marjorie Kamys Cotera

Texans Rally U.S. House to Lift Oil Export Ban

A decades-long ban on crude oil exports is up for repeal, legislation that is expected to glide through the U.S. House at the end of the week. While there is little doubt that the House will pass the repeal, it still faces serious obstacles before becoming law. 

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