In Harvey's Wake

The devastation was swift, and the recovery is far from over. Sign up for our ongoing coverage of Hurricane Harvey's aftermath. You can help by sharing your story here or sending a tip to harvey@texastribune.org.

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Across Southeast Texas and along much of the Texas Gulf Coast, residents are returning to cities devastated by Hurricane Harvey. And flooding still remained in some areas of the state 10 days after Harvey first hit the Texas coast on Aug. 25.

Gov. Greg Abbott has said the cost of storm recovery could reach $180 billion in federal funds, a total that would be $60 billion more than what was needed for recovery efforts after Hurricane Katrina.

Texans will be dealing with the Harvey's aftermath for a long time to come. But they've already started the process of ripping out drywall and floors from homes, discarding water-damaged furniture and ruined possessions, clearing debris, and helping their neighbors.

Here's a look at just some of what Texans are dealing with after Harvey. To see captions, press the "i" on the status bar of the slideshow.

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Read related Tribune coverage:

  • Experts say the flooding in the Houston region could have wreaked far less havoc if local officials had made different decisions over the last several decades. But the former head of a key flood control agency strongly disagreed with that take in an interview last year. [Full story]

  • In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, an exploding chemical plant and spikes in cancer-causing emissions are highlighting how little the public knows about potential dangers from the oil and chemical industries. Critics say one reason for the darkness: tons of campaign money. [Full story]

  • The Texas Tribune wants to hear from families who were displaced by Hurricane Harvey and are trying to get their children back in school. Take our survey and tell us what's factoring into your decision on where to enroll your kids. [Full story]

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