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Scenes of a Debate Over Big Bend Pipeline

Two companies are teaming up to build a 143-mile pipeline to carry natural gas through the Big Bend region and into Mexico. An unlikely coalition is fighting to thwart the project. See these images related to the battle over the plan.

By Cooper Neill
A sign opposing the Trans-Pecos pipeline is shown outside the home of Suzanne Bailey and Tom Short in Alpine in June 2015. Their house sits a few feet from one of the first visible signs that the pipeline is coming: a 23-acre lot that's set to be a staging area for segments of the pipeline. The couple complained of frequent loud noise and shaking of their home as heavy machinery works to smooth the land.
An aerial photograph of the Big Bend region near Alpine, where opposition to the proposed Trans-Pecos pipeline has grown since residents first learned of the project, which will send huge amounts of gas into Mexico.
David Keller, an archaeologist at Sul Ross State University and head of the Big Bend Conservation Alliance, looks over the Big Bend region near Alpine, where the proposed Trans-Pecos pipeline will run. Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners plans to start construction in early 2016.
An aerial photograph of the Big Bend region near Alpine, where the proposed pipeline will run, stirring concerns among landowners and environmentalists in the largely untouched region.
A view of Alpine residents protesting the pipeline on June 19, 2015.
Locals protest the proposed pipeline in downtown Alpine. In some weeks, the protests  have drawn dozens of residents.
The sun sets in a neighborhood near where the proposed Trans-Pecos pipeline is planned to run outside of Alpine.
A home in a neighborhood near where the pipeline is planned to run outside of Alpine .
Alpine Mayor Avinash Rangra discusses his opposition to the Trans Pecos Pipeline during a June protest. The Alpine City Council has asked the Obama administration to deny Energy Transfer Partners' permit application to cross the Texas-Mexico border.
A general view of the landscape near where the Trans-Pecos pipeline is believed could run near Alpine.
A sign opposing the Trans-Pecos pipeline hangs in a neighborhood near where the pipeline could run near Alpine.

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