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Analysis: Five Myths About Ted Cruz

A political nobody just three years ago, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas is the first official candidate vying for the Republican Party’s 2016 presidential nomination. Cruz has become a national figure — and one who is often misunderstood.

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz

A political nobody just three years ago, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas is the first official candidate vying for the Republican Party’s 2016 presidential nomination. His was a noisy entrance into government, marked by outspokenness and partisanship that clearly delighted part of the public even as they irritated many of his colleagues. In a remarkably short period, Cruz has become a national figure — and one who is often misunderstood. Here are five myths about Ted Cruz.

1. Ted Cruz is anti-establishment.

Cruz earned his iconoclastic cred in part by not waiting in line for his turn to run for high office and in part by refusing to play the quiet, unnoticed freshman in the Senate. He has aggravated more-experienced Republicans in Austin and in Washington by appealing to the party’s fringes rather than its center.

But Cruz’s résumé is crammed with establishment credentials. He holds degrees from Princeton and Harvard; clerked for Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist; worked as an adviser on the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush, who was the clear establishment candidate in that race; and served as solicitor general for the state of Texas. And if you’re part of the U.S. Senate, you’re part of the establishment.

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