Skip to main content

Hotter, Drier Projections Threaten Texas Miracle

Climate scientists project that Texas will be hotter and drier in the coming decades, which means less rainwater will make it into lakes and reservoirs, and more will evaporate. That could spell trouble for the state's fast-growing cities and industry.

by Neena Satija, The Texas Tribune and Reveal
The decreasing water line on Lake Arrowhead, one of three lakes the city of Wichita Falls gets its water from, is pictured here on Jan. 25, 2013.

Climate scientists project that Texas will be hotter and drier in the coming decades, which means less rainwater will make it into lakes and reservoirs, and more will evaporate. That could spell major trouble for the state's fast-growing cities and industry, along with agriculture, but water planners are not taking these climate projections into account. 

This story was produced in collaboration with The World, a program by Public Radio International. 

 

Informed voters, strong democracy with your help

Yes, I'll donate today

Explore related story topics