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Inside Texas Politics: Voter ID

On this week's edition of WFAA-TV's Inside Texas Politics, we talk about another "oops" moment from Gov. Rick Perry, the voter ID law trial in Corpus Christi, how ads from both sides of the governors' race aim to define Greg Abbott and more.

Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey on WFAA-TV's "Inside Texas Politics" on Sept. 7, 2014.

On this week's edition of WFAA-TV's Inside Texas Politics, I talked with host Jason Whitely and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's Bud Kennedy about another "oops" moment from Gov. Rick Perry, who gives every indication he's making another run for president. This time an errant (and inaccurate) Twitter post from Perry's account was made about Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg. Her office houses the public integrity unit for which Perry vetoed state funding after she refused to step down following a drunken driving conviction. Vetoing budget items clearly falls within the governor's power, but Perry is facing two felony indictments related to his threat to veto the funding.

We also talked about University of Texas System Regent Wallace Hall, who is also facing a Travis County grand jury investigation; Texas' voter ID law, which was very much in the news this week with a trial in Corpus Christi and a Dallas Morning News story reporting on the raid of a Houston voter registration organization by Attorney General (and GOP gubernatorial nominee) Greg Abbott's office; and the efforts by both sides to define Abbott — his Democratic opponent Wendy Davis has released a series of negative ads,  and Abbott's campaign has released spots emphasizing his personal qualities.

Also: Jason and Bud interview U.S. Sen. John Cornyn. Jason talks with Gary Huddleston, the director of consumer affairs for the grocery chain Kroger and the former Texas Retailers Association chairman, about the Dallas City Council's imposition of a nickel fee for plastic bags. According to a recent ruling out of the state attorney general's office, the measure may violate state law. And the recent announcement that the federal government is investigating the Ferguson, Mo., police department following the recent shooting of a young black man and the subsequent unrest there is the subject of this week's debate.

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