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2010: Suspended! Darren Yancy's Real Estate License

Darren Yancy, the Republican running for Sen. Kip Averitt's Waco seat, shows off his professional accomplishments on his Web site. One thing it doesn't mention: A 12-month suspension of his real estate license.

Darren Yancy, the Republican running for Sen. Kip Averitt's Waco seat, shows off his professional accomplishments on his Web site. "Today Darren’s operation boasts 1,500 clients and over $6 million in premiums each year," his bio reads.

One thing it doesn't mention: A 12-month suspension of his real estate license that began in August 2009. He's already served the first three months, and the other nine were probated.

According to a Yancy statement:

"Yancy brought a buyer to the seller that had credit, money, and desire to buy. The individual was also Hispanic. The seller refused to sell [to] the buyer stating they would not '…sell to a Mexican.' When Yancy refused to run off the buyer, things went south between Yancy and his seller."

Apparently the Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC) disagreed with Yancy's account; they gave him a lengthy suspension. According to the description on the agency's Web site, Yancy received the suspension for "acting negligently and engaging in conduct that demonstrates untrustworthiness in completing contract forms" as well as structuring his commission to "the disadvantage of his client."

According to the TREC general counsel Loretta DeHay, Yancy agreed to the decision. "That was an agreed order," she said.  "There wasn't a judge involved; there were no witnesses."

Yancy's press release says he could not challenge the ruling for fear "I would be suspended for 12 months instead of three if I challenged and lost." Presumably he means he would not have the probate option, since, according to the TREC Web site, he received a 12 month suspension as it was.

Yancy's statement says a third party will soon come forward to clear his name. The candidate did not respond to phone calls.

"We have people who feel from time to time they didn’t do anything wrong," says TREC chairman John Eckstrum of the general disciplinary system and not Yancy's case specifically. "In reality they should have known ... most of the time."

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