Tribpedia: Voter ID

Tribpedia

After six years and three legislative sessions of sharp debate divided along party lines, the Texas Legislature passed a law in 2011 that required voters to show a photo ID in order to vote. The House passed its version in March, 101-48. After differences between the Senate and House versions were ironed out, both chambers approved the final version, SB ...

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This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.
This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.

Senator: State Not Moving to Make Voter IDs Available

More than a week ago, Texas Senate Democrats told Texas Secretary of State Nandita Berry they wanted her office to get more mobile units on Texas streets to give voters without an acceptable photo ID a chance to get one before November's election. One week later, there's been no movement to do so, says state Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin.

 

 

This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.
This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.

Democratic Lawmakers Ask For More Mobile Voter ID Units

Members of the Senate Democratic Caucus, concerned over the low number of residents eligible to vote who have no photo indentification to do so have asked Secretary of State Nandita Berry to work on making mobile ID units more available between now and November.

UT/TT Poll: Texans Split on Immigration Overhaul

A slight majority of Texas registered voters would support an overhaul of federal immigration law that includes a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, according to the University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll. And 47 percent would rather have local and state officials enforce those laws than the federal government.

Texas Voting Rights Dispute Enters Another Round

Texas Weekly

Texas Republicans and Democrats are still at odds over voter ID and redistricting, but the venue has changed. During the legislative sessions, the Republicans have been on offense with the Democrats on defense. Now, in court, those tables are turned, with Democrats and the Obama administration moving aggressively against the GOP-backed measures.

About Those Free Voter ID Cards

Texas Weekly

Texans aren’t exactly lining up to get the free voter ID certificates the Texas DPS is required to distribute under the terms of the state’s controversial voter ID law. As of late July, the department had issued just six of the documents across the state. Both sides say the small numbers are proof they were right about the new law. 

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in the Hancock Center on Tuesday Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in the Hancock Center on Tuesday Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.

What Would Happen if Voting Were Easier?

Voting is not exactly hard, but it is a hassle. What if it wasn't? Suppose it could be done in a way that got everyone voting without raising serious questions about security and voter fraud. Suppose practically everyone eligible to vote in an election in Texas actually did so. Would we get the same results we get now?