Tribpedia: Voter ID

Tribpedia

After six years and three legislative sessions of sharp debate divided along party lines, the Texas Legislature passed a law in 2011 that required voters to show a photo ID in order to vote. The House passed its version in March, 101-48. After differences between the Senate and House versions were ironed out, both chambers approved the final version, SB ...

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Vote signs outside early voting locations in Austin on Feb. 23, 2014.
Vote signs outside early voting locations in Austin on Feb. 23, 2014.

Analysis: A Missing Piece in the Voter ID Debate

State leaders asked for and received a study that said the voter photo ID law would leave more than a half-million voters without required state-issued IDs. But they didn't tell most legislators about it, according to a federal judge's findings. And recent court rulings put that law into a strange place: It is simultaneously enforceable and unconstitutional.

Analysis: Behind Voter ID, Federal Pre-Clearance

Woven into the recent federal ruling that found the state's voter photo ID law unconstitutional is a bigger question for Texas lawmakers — whether the state should have to seek federal permission when it changes election and voting laws. That requirement was recently lifted by the U.S. Supreme Court, but it can be reinstated when states discriminate against minorities.

Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey on WFAA-TV's "Inside Texas Politics" on Oct. 19, 2014, 2014.
Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey on WFAA-TV's "Inside Texas Politics" on Oct. 19, 2014, 2014.

Inside Texas Politics: 'Tis The Season to Start Voting

With the early voting  starting tomorrow, this week's edition of WFAA-TV's Inside Texas Politics with host David Schechter, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's Bud Kennedy and Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey has a decidedly electoral slant. 

Newsreel: Ebola, Voter ID, Abortion

Texas Weekly

This week in the Texas Weekly Newsreel: Ebola has become a big political story this October, the back and forth on the state's voter ID law continues just days before voting starts, and the U.S. Supreme Court says Texas abortion clinics should remain open while courts consider the lawsuits challenging that state law.

After Voter ID Ruling, Appeals Race Begins

A federal ruling that Texas' strict voter ID law discriminates against minority voters has kicked off a rapid-fire legal race over whether photo identification will be required on Election Day this November, according to legal experts. "It gets very tricky now that we're so close to the election," said Joseph Fishkin, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law.

 

This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.
This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.

Senator: State Not Moving to Make Voter IDs Available

More than a week ago, Texas Senate Democrats told Texas Secretary of State Nandita Berry they wanted her office to get more mobile units on Texas streets to give voters without an acceptable photo ID a chance to get one before November's election. One week later, there's been no movement to do so, says state Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin.

 

 

This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.
This is a sample Texas Election Identification Certificate, available for those voters who do not have an acceptable form of photo ID such as a driver's license or a U.S. passport.

Democratic Lawmakers Ask For More Mobile Voter ID Units

Members of the Senate Democratic Caucus, concerned over the low number of residents eligible to vote who have no photo indentification to do so have asked Secretary of State Nandita Berry to work on making mobile ID units more available between now and November.

UT/TT Poll: Texans Split on Immigration Overhaul

A slight majority of Texas registered voters would support an overhaul of federal immigration law that includes a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, according to the University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll. And 47 percent would rather have local and state officials enforce those laws than the federal government.