Tribpedia: Voter ID

Tribpedia

After six years and three legislative sessions of sharp debate divided along party lines, the Texas Legislature passed a law in 2011 that required voters to show a photo ID in order to vote. The House passed its version in March, 101-48. After differences between the Senate and House versions were ironed out, both chambers approved the final version, SB ...

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Texas Voting Rights Dispute Enters Another Round

Texas Weekly

Texas Republicans and Democrats are still at odds over voter ID and redistricting, but the venue has changed. During the legislative sessions, the Republicans have been on offense with the Democrats on defense. Now, in court, those tables are turned, with Democrats and the Obama administration moving aggressively against the GOP-backed measures.

About Those Free Voter ID Cards

Texas Weekly

Texans aren’t exactly lining up to get the free voter ID certificates the Texas DPS is required to distribute under the terms of the state’s controversial voter ID law. As of late July, the department had issued just six of the documents across the state. Both sides say the small numbers are proof they were right about the new law. 

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in the Hancock Center on Tuesday Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in the Hancock Center on Tuesday Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.

What Would Happen if Voting Were Easier?

Voting is not exactly hard, but it is a hassle. What if it wasn't? Suppose it could be done in a way that got everyone voting without raising serious questions about security and voter fraud. Suppose practically everyone eligible to vote in an election in Texas actually did so. Would we get the same results we get now?

House Backs Bill Limiting Mail-In Ballot Collection

The states's lower chamber tentatively approved a measure that would make it a class A misdemeanor for a person to collect and deposit 10 or more mail-in ballots from other voters during an election. It strikes back at Democrats who in 2011 alleged there wasn’t a need for a state voter ID law because most of the fraud at the ballot box occurs on mail-in ballots.

Bill That Cuts Early-Voting Period Likely to Be Pulled

Even during a legislative session where voter ID and redistricting are not at the forefront, the politics surrounding casting a ballot prove as volatile as ever. During a House Elections Committee on Monday, a measure that would have reduced the state's required early voting days drew  heated debate on familiar issues: voter turnout and voter suppression. 

Race and Change in Voter ID Support

Attorney General Greg Abbott's office has argued that Texans of all races strongly support voter ID. While this was true as recently as early 2011, the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll shows that there has been a sea change. 

Updated: Supreme Court Begins Oral Arguments on Section 5

Leading up to Wednesday’s oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, lawmakers said the decision on whether to uphold Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act will affect progress that propelled minorities to more equal ground in Texas. The court will decide if Congress overstepped its authority when it reauthorized the landmark civil rights legislation for 25 years.

Video: Texas Democrats Defend Section 5

At a news conference leading up to Wednesday’s oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, some Democratic lawmakers said the issue at hand — whether to uphold Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act — deals with a statute that has helped propel minorities to more equal ground in a state with a history of racial discrimination.

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the Flawn Academic Center on the University of Texas at Austin campus on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the Flawn Academic Center on the University of Texas at Austin campus on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.

Polling Center: The Partisan Split on Voting Rights

Overall, Texas voters — by a slight majority — believe the federal government should continue oversight of the state's changes in election laws, according to the October 2012 University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll. But partisans are split, with Republicans strongly in favor of ending the required permission of the federal government.

Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the Flawn Academic Center on the University of Texas at Austin campus on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at the Flawn Academic Center on the University of Texas at Austin campus on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas.

Texas Officials Seek End to Federal Election Oversight

Texas Weekly

The U.S. Supreme Court may determine the fate of a key provision of the Voting Rights Act that became an Achilles' heel for Republican lawmakers this year. That could free Texas from federal oversight in election laws.