Tribpedia: Governor's Office

Tribpedia

The Texas Governor's Office includes several divisions and offices in charge of implementing the governor's policy visions for the state. As of July 2009, 278 employees worked for the office of the governor.

The offices of the governor include:

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Surrounding Gov. Rick Perry are (clockwise, from bottom left) Jeffrey Boyd, Mike Toomey, David Medina, Deirdre Delisi, Mike McKinney, Phil Wilson, Jay Kimbrough and John Steen.
Surrounding Gov. Rick Perry are (clockwise, from bottom left) Jeffrey Boyd, Mike Toomey, David Medina, Deirdre Delisi, Mike McKinney, Phil Wilson, Jay Kimbrough and John Steen.

Perry Helps Advisers Take a Big Next Step

“Career coach” is not listed on Gov. Rick Perry’s résumé — but it might as well be. In the 12 years he has held Texas’ highest elected office, he has helped align the professional stars for many of his key advisers — or else simply charted their courses for them. Few fare as well as his chiefs of staff.

The second annual Texas Tribune Festival kicked off with with a conversation between Texas governor Rick Perry and Tribune founder and CEO Evan Smith in the Grand Ballroom of the AT&T Conference Center in Austin, Texas on September 21, 2012.
The second annual Texas Tribune Festival kicked off with with a conversation between Texas governor Rick Perry and Tribune founder and CEO Evan Smith in the Grand Ballroom of the AT&T Conference Center in Austin, Texas on September 21, 2012.

Perry Shuffles the Deck

Texas Weekly

As he enters the last regular session of this term as governor, Rick Perry opts for a trusted supporter in a top political job and a respected agency manager to run his own office.

Rick Perry and Jeffrey Boyd
Rick Perry and Jeffrey Boyd

In Judicial Picks, Perry Reaches Past Executive Branch

Gov. Rick Perry's control of the executive branch after 12 years in office is well established. But he's made hundreds of judicial appointments too, people who generally agree with his ideas about judicial philosophy and the law. It’s a bit of a crapshoot, because those judges are free, once appointed, from any accountability to the state’s chief executive.

Gov. Rick Perry, speaks at the site in Jonestown, Texas, where volunteers will build a home for injured war veteran Augustine "Augie" Pena.
Gov. Rick Perry, speaks at the site in Jonestown, Texas, where volunteers will build a home for injured war veteran Augustine "Augie" Pena.

Aide's Talk About 2014 May Benefit Perry in 2013

When Ken Armbrister, chief legislative aide to Gov. Rick Perry, said last week that Perry had told him he was going to run for re-election in 2014, Armbrister may have done his boss a favor. Those who thought they might be dealing with a lame duck during the 2013 legislative session have something to think about.

Texas Governor's Mansion: A Timeline

As Gov. Rick Perry and his wife prepare to move back into the restored Governor's Mansion, we take a look back at some of the highlights of the building's history. From the installation of toilets, to a clever trick to stop children from sliding down banisters to the as-yet unsolved arson and subsequent restoration, the mansion has seen its share of changes.

Texas Enterprise Fund Set to Help Apple Grow in Austin

Apple Inc., which has reported having $100 billion in cash on hand, could get up to $35.5 million in various state and local incentives if it expands its operations in Austin. The state plans to invest $21 million from its Texas Enterprise Fund for the project. Critics of the tax deal with Apple question why the uber-rich company should get such breaks.

Texas Gets a D+ in Public Integrity Study

Texas scored a 68 out of 100, coming in at 27th place in a national state integrity study. The state got high marks for auditing and for monitoring pension funds, but not as high for accountability of the governor and legislators.

Hurricane Ike era blue tarps still on the roof a Hurricane Ike damaged home near downtown in Houston, July 28, 2011.
Hurricane Ike era blue tarps still on the roof a Hurricane Ike damaged home near downtown in Houston, July 28, 2011.

Amid Finger-Pointing, Hurricane Relief Lags

Nearly four years after Hurricanes Ike and Dolly destroyed homes near the Texas coast, thousands of Texans are still waiting for housing assistance. The long-term disaster recovery effort funded by the federal government has made little headway. But where two state agencies faltered, another is stepping in.

John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas' state climatologist and professor at Texas A&M University, spoke recently at a climate conference in Austin.
John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas' state climatologist and professor at Texas A&M University, spoke recently at a climate conference in Austin.

State Climatologist Has Eye on the Sky for Texas

John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas' state climatologist since 2000, has seen his duties explode in the last 18 months amid public clamor for information on the drought. He'd like to get more funding for the role, from Texas A&M University or possibly even the Legislature — though whether he'll get it is not certain.

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott on Jan. 3, 2012, greeting members of the Texas "strike force" in Iowa to support Gov. Rick Perry's presidential bid.
Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott on Jan. 3, 2012, greeting members of the Texas "strike force" in Iowa to support Gov. Rick Perry's presidential bid.

Governor's Plan to Run Could Impede Attorney General

Speculation about Rick Perry's next move is a full-time preoccupation in Austin. Greg Abbott appears all set to run for governor, but Perry might be in his way. It feels a little like 2010, when some thought Perry was a lame-duck governor, but he decided to run again and beat Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison on the way to re-election.

Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.

The Morning After: Perry Returns from the Trail

Texas Weekly

When the Legislature decamped from Austin in July, there was a sense of order in Texas politics. And yet, as Rick Perry returns a mere seven months later, conditions on the ground in Texas border on the chaotic.

Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry at his last campaign stop of 2011 in Boone, Iowa, on Dec. 31, 2011.

Rick Perry Returns to Texas, and to Texas Politics

The underlying fundamentals that buttressed Gov. Rick Perry's political power in the state are not much changed, and they suggest that he will reassert his powerful presence in Texas politics now that he is back. His relationship with voters may be in a rut, but when it comes to the legislators, business interests and interest groups who practice politics every day, he still holds sway.

The rubble of a house remains after last weeks' wildfire remains untouched on September 9, 2011.
The rubble of a house remains after last weeks' wildfire remains untouched on September 9, 2011.

Dispute Continues Between Texas, Feds on Fire Help

Did the federal government drag its feet in providing disaster relief to the victims of the devastating Bastrop County fires? It depends on whom you ask. It's the latest chapter in a dispute between Texas and the Obama Administration that began in April, when Gov. Rick Perry submitted a broad request for help because of fires burning throughout the state.

Austin Protesters Rally Against Perry

While Gov. Rick Perry and his supporters were praying in Houston, several hundred protesters were rallying against him at the state Capitol Saturday afternoon. U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett and others ripped the governor and said he was cynically using "Prayer-Palooza" to launch his presidential campaign.

Video: Perry Defends Travel Expenses

As he crosses the nation in what could turn out to be a presidential bid, the governor’s airfare, hotel bills and security costs are paid for with a mix of campaign dollars and private and public money. State law allows him to keep much of it confidential. At a Tuesday press conference, the governor said regardless of whether he decides to run for the GOP presidential nomination, he will continue traveling to promote the state of Texas. 

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 7/4/11

Aguilar on a change in law that affects applications for state-issued IDs, Galbraith on how the drought is taking its toll on wildlife, Hamilton on an outsider's attempt to lower the cost of higher ed, Murphy visualizes the partisanship of House members, Ramsey on who becomes Lite Guv if David Dewhurst takes another job, Ramshaw on life in the colonias and three stories about Rick Perry — Grissom on how his death penalty stance might play in a 2012 presidential race, Root on how he cemented his reputation as one of the state's most powerful governors and Tan on the growing demand for him to speak elsewhere: The best of our best content from July 4 to July 8, 2011.

Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signed HB 274, which brings lawsuit reforms to Texas courts, including a loser pay system for frivolous lawsuits on May 30th,2011
Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signed HB 274, which brings lawsuit reforms to Texas courts, including a loser pay system for frivolous lawsuits on May 30th,2011

Texplainer: What About Bills Perry Won't Sign or Veto?

Hey Texplainer: What happens to the bills that Perry doesn't sign or veto? Gov. Rick Perry has vetoed and signed a multitude of bills this year, but to date there have been 27 he allowed to become law by default. By not signing a bill and allowing it to pass into law, a governor can walk the delicate line between defying the Lege and actually supporting the content of the bill in question.