Jay Root Reporter

Jay Root is a native of Liberty. He never knew any reporters growing up, and he has never taken a journalism class in his life. But somehow he got hooked on the news business. It all started when Root walked into the offices of The Daily Texan, his college newspaper, during his last year at the University of Texas in 1987. He couldn't resist the draw: it was the biggest collection of misfits ever assembled. After graduating, he took a job at a Houston chemical company and soon realized it wasn't for him. Root applied for an unpaid internship at the Houston Post in 1990, and it turned into a full-time job that same year. He has been a reporter ever since. Root has covered natural disasters, live music and Texas politics — not necessarily in that order. He was Austin bureau chief of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for a dozen years, most of them good. He also covered politics and the Legislature for The Associated Press before joining the staff of the Tribune.Root is the author of “Oops! A Diary From The 2012 Campaign Trail,” an insider’s account of Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s dramatic collapse in the 2012 presidential race. The book was released in September, 2012.

Recent Contributions

Tea Party Leader Says He Misspoke About Black Voters

Steve Munisteri campaigning for Texas GOP chairman.
Steve Munisteri campaigning for Texas GOP chairman.

UPDATED: Dallas Tea Party leader Ken Emanuelson says he misspoke when he said last month that Republicans don't want to encourage blacks to vote because they overwhelmingly support Democrats. State GOP Chairman Steve Munisteri had said Emanuelson's remarks don't reflect the party's position.

Perry Open to Expanding Special Session Agenda

Texas Governor Rick Perry ceremonially signed House Bill 4, which lays the foundation for Texas' future water needs. He is joined by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Allan Ritter, R-Nederland and Sen. Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay on May 28, 2013
Texas Governor Rick Perry ceremonially signed House Bill 4, which lays the foundation for Texas' future water needs. He is joined by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Allan Ritter, R-Nederland and Sen. Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay on May 28, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry told reporters Friday that he is leaving open the possibility of adding more items to the agenda of the special legislative session, but he wants to first see specific proposals that have a chance of passing.

Perry Hails Water Bill, is Evasive on His Future

Texas Governor Rick Perry ceremonially signed House Bill 4, which lays the foundation for Texas' future water needs. He is joined by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Allan Ritter, R-Nederland and Sen. Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay on May 28, 2013
Texas Governor Rick Perry ceremonially signed House Bill 4, which lays the foundation for Texas' future water needs. He is joined by Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Allan Ritter, R-Nederland and Sen. Troy Fraser, R-Horseshoe Bay on May 28, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry signed a major water infrastructure bill into law on May 28. Speaking to reporters afterward, he remained coy about his political future and wouldn't say if he will add any items to the special session agenda.

Which Votes Will Haunt Lawmakers?

Lt. Governor David Dewhurst signs a stack of bills during a recess in the Senate session on May 22, 2013.
Lt. Governor David Dewhurst signs a stack of bills during a recess in the Senate session on May 22, 2013.
Texas Weekly

Gov. Rick Perry has until June 16 to sign or veto bills from the legislative session, but political operatives are already combing through the records of the proceedings, looking for votes that might haunt legislators in next year's elections.

Perry Calls Special Legislative Session

Gov. Rick Perry leaves the House chamber after speaking and visiting with members on May 13, 2013.
Gov. Rick Perry leaves the House chamber after speaking and visiting with members on May 13, 2013.

Gov. Rick Perry called lawmakers back into an immediate special session to consider redistricting for the Legislature and the Texans serving in Congress. But some legislators want him to expand the call to other issues. 

 

 

 

Texans Seek Bipartisanship in a Sharply Divided D.C.

With an eye toward restoring at least a modicum of bipartisanship in bitterly divided Washington, a group of Texans in Congress wants to bring back meetings of the entire delegation without regard to party affiliation.
With an eye toward restoring at least a modicum of bipartisanship in bitterly divided Washington, a group of Texans in Congress wants to bring back meetings of the entire delegation without regard to party affiliation.

U.S. Reps. Kevin Brady and Pete Gallego are from different political parties, but they are united in trying to bring a little bipartisanship to the Texas delegation. They have scheduled a breakfast next week to discuss ways to forge a common agenda for the state.