Brandi Grissom Managing Editor

Brandi Grissom is The Texas Tribune's managing editor and joined the staff when the online publication launched in 2009. In addition to editing duties, Grissom leads the Tribune's coverage of criminal justice issues. During her tenure at the Tribune, she was chosen as a 2012 City University of New York Center on Media, Crime and Justice/H.F. Guggenheim Journalism Fellow and was a fellow at the 2012 Journalist Law School at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. Grissom, along with Tribune multimedia producer Justin Dehn, received a 2012 regional Edward R. Murrow Award for investigative reporting for work on the case of Megan Winfrey, who was acquitted of murder in February 2013 after the Trib’s coverage brought statewide attention the case. Grissom joined the Tribune after four years at the El Paso Times, where she acted as a one-woman Capitol bureau. Grissom won the Associated Press Managing Editors First-Place Award in 2007 for using the Freedom of Information Act to report stories on a variety of government programs and entities, and the ACLU of Texas named her legislative reporter of the year in 2007 for her immigration reporting. She previously served as managing editor at The Daily Texan and has worked for the Alliance Times-Herald, the Taylor Daily Press, the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung and The Associated Press. A native of Alliance, Neb., she has a degree in history from the University of Texas.

Recent Contributions

Budget Cuts Would Undo Prison Re-Entry Reforms

William Crow, 41, who did two years for drug possession, crouches in the shop adjoining the bus station where recently released inmates are buying new clothes, shoes and cigarettes in Huntsville, Texas on March 4, 2011.
William Crow, 41, who did two years for drug possession, crouches in the shop adjoining the bus station where recently released inmates are buying new clothes, shoes and cigarettes in Huntsville, Texas on March 4, 2011.

Criminal justice advocates say proposed cuts from rehabilitation and treatment programs would reverse years of reforms in Texas that have helped reduce recidivism and drive down the size of the prison population.

Out On Their Own: Re-entering Society After Prison

William Crow, Elliott Cornett and Daniel Barraza, all recently released inmates, walk away from the Walls Unit in Huntsville, Texas on March 4, 2011. State legislators are considering halving the $100 given to inmates upon their re-entry to society.
William Crow, Elliott Cornett and Daniel Barraza, all recently released inmates, walk away from the Walls Unit in Huntsville, Texas on March 4, 2011. State legislators are considering halving the $100 given to inmates upon their re-entry to society.

Sights and sounds from Huntsville when prisoners were released from the Walls Unit on March 4.

Shay Bilchik: The TT Interview

Shay Bilchik, director of the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University Public Policy Institute
Shay Bilchik, director of the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University Public Policy Institute

The director of the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown Public Policy Institute on the factors Texas lawmakers should consider as they seek to make budget cuts while continuing the reforms they started in 2007.

Bill Would Make Restroom Peeping a Felony

State Rep. Garnet Coleman, D-Houston, at the 2010 Texas Democratic convention in Corpus Christi, Tex. on June 26.
State Rep. Garnet Coleman, D-Houston, at the 2010 Texas Democratic convention in Corpus Christi, Tex. on June 26.

State Rep. Garnet Coleman, D-Houston, filed a bill today that would make it a state jail felony to "lewdly violate" a person's privacy in a place like a public restroom.

U.S. Supreme Court Keeps Hank Skinner Alive, Again

Hank Skinner was sentenced to death for the 1993 triple slaying of his girlfriend and her two sons.
Hank Skinner was sentenced to death for the 1993 triple slaying of his girlfriend and her two sons.
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The U.S. Supreme Court has given Texas death row inmate Hank Skinner another chance at getting DNA testing done on evidence he says could prove he did not kill his live-in girlfriend and her two sons in 1993.

Plan Would Make Texas Jails Pay for Inspections

Inspectors testing the emergency ventilation of the unit for fire code compliance tests at Dallas County Jail.
Inspectors testing the emergency ventilation of the unit for fire code compliance tests at Dallas County Jail.

To keep critical jail inspections going even as they cut funding to the agency that provides them, lawmakers are proposing that the counties pay for them.

House Delays Abortion Sonogram Debate

Rep. Carol Alvarado (D-Houston) holds a sonogram device on the House floor during debate on HB15 March 2, 2011
Rep. Carol Alvarado (D-Houston) holds a sonogram device on the House floor during debate on HB15 March 2, 2011

House lawmakers delayed consideration of abortion sonogram legislation until tomorrow, after Democrats raised two points of order against the bill. Some speculate finding technicalities will be Democrats' go-to strategy this session.  

Ron Kirk: The TT Interview

The U.S. trade representative took a brief time-out during his visit to Austin last week to talk with the Tribune about trade with Mexico, public perception of the Obama administration, Dallas politics and his own political future.

Disability Advocates: "No Cuts! No Cuts!"

People with disabilities rally at Texas Capitol opposing budget cuts to home and community-based services. March 1st, 2011
People with disabilities rally at Texas Capitol opposing budget cuts to home and community-based services. March 1st, 2011

Disability advocates gathered at the Capitol today to call on lawmakers to use the Rainy Day Fund, to raise new revenue and, above all else, to not cut community-based services for the disabled. Over and over again the crowd chanted, "No cuts! No cuts!"

Rev. Carroll Pickett: The TT Interview

Rev. Carroll Pickett holds the world record for witnessing the most state executions as a chaplain. He saw 95 men die by lethal injection during his career as the death house chaplain.

The onetime death house chaplain on what it was like to witness the most state executions of anyone in his job (95, by lethal injection), what changed his mind about the death penalty and why lawmakers should continue to fund the chaplain program.