Tribpedia: Medicaid

State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, talks with Rep. Tom Craddick, R-Midland, on the House floor April 25, 2017.  Zerwas is co-chair of the House/Senate conference committee studying the state budget which had its organization meeting Monday. 
<p>State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, talks with Rep. Tom Craddick, R-Midland, on the House floor April 25, 2017. &nbsp;Zerwas is co-chair of the House/Senate conference committee studying the state budget which had its organization meeting Monday.&nbsp;</p>

Legislature opts to largely maintain cuts of therapy services for disabled children

The House grudgingly voted to accept the Senate's supplemental budget proposal, which would not restore funding for disabled children's therapy services.

The Women's Health Advisory Committee took testimony from the public regarding the Healthy Women Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver application. Blanca Murillo, a former UT student, gives testimony on her experience with Planned Parenthood at the Health and Human Services Commission Brown-Heatly building in Austin on&nbsp;May 15, 2017.
<p><span>The Women's Health Advisory Committee took testimony from the public regarding the Healthy Women Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver application. Blanca Murillo, a former UT student, gives testimony on her experience with Planned Parenthood at the Health and Human Services Commission Brown-Heatly building in Austin on&nbsp;May 15, 2017.</span></p>

Texas wants to renew federal women's health funding it lost over Planned Parenthood

With a Republican president in the White House, Texas health officials are seeking to restore federal family planning funding they gave up under the Obama administration to take a stand against Planned Parenthood. 

Nelda Hunter, House Appropriations Committee clerk, confers with chair State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, during a public hearing Feb. 15, 2017 on health and human services funding and border security.
Nelda Hunter, House Appropriations Committee clerk, confers with chair State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, during a public hearing Feb. 15, 2017 on health and human services funding and border security.

Texas House budget writers send budget to full House with massive health care cut

“I am absolutely confident that services won’t be compromised," state Rep. John Zerwas, R-Richmond, said of the cuts.

Lauretta Jackson, a physical therapist from Any Baby Can, works with Sara weekly to improve her body strength. Nonprofit therapy providers are worried budget cuts made by lawmakers will put them out of business.
Lauretta Jackson, a physical therapist from Any Baby Can, works with Sara weekly to improve her body strength. Nonprofit therapy providers are worried budget cuts made by lawmakers will put them out of business.

Texas moves forward with cuts of therapy services for disabled children

In two weeks, Texas will officially enact cuts of Medicaid reimbursement rates for disabled children's therapy services. 

Lauretta Jackson, a physical therapist from Any Baby Can, works with Sara weekly to improve her body strength. Nonprofit therapy providers are worried budget cuts made by lawmakers will put them out of business.
Lauretta Jackson, a physical therapist from Any Baby Can, works with Sara weekly to improve her body strength. Nonprofit therapy providers are worried budget cuts made by lawmakers will put them out of business.

East Texas Children Lose Therapy Services in Budget Cut Fallout

Lawmakers wanted the state to pay less for children's therapy services without cutting off access to care, but that balance is proving impossible in some cases.

Texas agrees to soften its voter ID law for the November elections, the state’s new campus carry gun law quietly takes effect and state officials give the ‘O.K.’ for Medicaid to pay for mosquito repellant to help combat the spread of Zika.
Texas agrees to soften its voter ID law for the November elections, the state’s new campus carry gun law quietly takes effect and state officials give the ‘O.K.’ for Medicaid to pay for mosquito repellant to help combat the spread of Zika.

Campus Carry, Zika, Voter ID Dominate the Week's Headlines (Video)

In the Roundup: Texas agrees to soften its voter ID law for the November elections, the state’s new campus carry gun law quietly takes effect and state officials give the O.K. for Medicaid to pay for mosquito repellant to help combat the spread of Zika.

Jasmine Johnson, with 10-month-old daughter Rain, lost her Medicaid coverage and was told she could not re-enroll, even though federal law allows former foster children like Johnson to stay in the health insurance program until they turn 26.
Jasmine Johnson, with 10-month-old daughter Rain, lost her Medicaid coverage and was told she could not re-enroll, even though federal law allows former foster children like Johnson to stay in the health insurance program until they turn 26.

Is Texas Denying Health Coverage to Foster Youth?

Advocates say Texas officials are routinely denying health care coverage to former foster children after they turn 21, even though federal law says the coverage should continue until they turn 26.

 

Texas Attorney Gen.  Ken Paxton, speaks at The Texas Response: Pastors, Marriage & Religious Freedom event at the First Baptist Church in Pflugerville, Texas on September 29, 2015
Texas Attorney Gen. Ken Paxton, speaks at The Texas Response: Pastors, Marriage & Religious Freedom event at the First Baptist Church in Pflugerville, Texas on September 29, 2015

Texas Files New Obamacare Suit Over Health Insurer Fee

In Texas' latest salvo against Obamacare, Attorney General Ken Paxton has filed suit over a fee states must help cover to pay for the sweeping federal health reform law.

 

 

George Thorne of Eye Physicians of Austin examined a patient on Sept. 30, 2015, while Shayla Martinez, a medical scribe, focused on updating the patient's medical records.
George Thorne of Eye Physicians of Austin examined a patient on Sept. 30, 2015, while Shayla Martinez, a medical scribe, focused on updating the patient's medical records.

New Era for Health Records Drives Demand for Documentation Help

Starting Thursday, most U.S. health care providers must switch to a new system of computer codes for recording patient ailments. Opinions are mixed about the changes, but they are clearly fueling a greater demand for medical scribes, who focus on entering patient data.