POLITICS: Special Interests

Is Ciudad Juárez on the brink of a new gang war?

A municipal police officer at a crime scene in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The municipal police force was recently "purged" under the new chief of police Julien Leyzaola.
A municipal police officer at a crime scene in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The municipal police force was recently "purged" under the new chief of police Julien Leyzaola.

October was the deadliest month in Ciudad Juárez in nearly three years. Locals are anxious — and hopeful they're not witnessing a resurgence of the brutal drug war that plagued this Mexican border city from 2008 to 2011.

Texas lawmakers hope election rhetoric doesn't swamp beneficial trade deals

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, operating a crane at the Port of Houston Authority on November 1, 2016. The port is ranked first in the country for imports and exports, and second for overall tonnage.
U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, operating a crane at the Port of Houston Authority on November 1, 2016. The port is ranked first in the country for imports and exports, and second for overall tonnage.

Trade has become an emotional hot-button issue this presidential election year, and some Texas lawmakers are worried about what that means for the future of the state's trade climate. 

Dan Patrick Again Targeting In-State Tuition For Undocumented Students

Former and current lawmakers gather at the Texas Capitol showing their support for HB 1403 which passed in 2001 ensuring that all Texas would have access to in-state college tuition regardless of immigration status.
Former and current lawmakers gather at the Texas Capitol showing their support for HB 1403 which passed in 2001 ensuring that all Texas would have access to in-state college tuition regardless of immigration status.

When Texas lawmakers meet next year, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is promising to again target a 2001 law that lets some undocumented immigrants pay in-state college tuition.

Senators Consider Texas Nominees for Long-Vacant Judicial Seats

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., to consider five nominees to fill vacancies on federal courts in Texas. The hearing was Sept. 7, 2016.
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., to consider five nominees to fill vacancies on federal courts in Texas. The hearing was Sept. 7, 2016.

During a hearing of the U.S. Senate’s Judiciary Committee that convened to consider nominees for five federal district court seats in Texas, the candidates promised senators they would steer clear of becoming activist judges.   

DACA Gave Thousands of Undocumented Texans Hope. Will it Survive November?

Immigrants and activists participate in press conference and rally on Nov. 19, 2015, before a 37-mile march to show support for immigration reform. The marchers planned to walk for three days, from the federal immigration detention facility in Taylor to the Texas Governor's Mansion in downtown Austin.
Immigrants and activists participate in press conference and rally on Nov. 19, 2015, before a 37-mile march to show support for immigration reform. The marchers planned to walk for three days, from the federal immigration detention facility in Taylor to the Texas Governor's Mansion in downtown Austin.

Undocumented immigrants in Texas are taking a glass-half-full approach as a 2012 initiative that has benefited hundreds of thousands of immigrants marks its four-year anniversary. But will that optimism last after the November election?

Starbucks in Havana? Close, But No Cigar

Yasmanny Alcantara, 20, sits in front of a mural near the home of Cuban artist Jose Fuster.
Yasmanny Alcantara, 20, sits in front of a mural near the home of Cuban artist Jose Fuster.

After more than 50 years of tension, normalizing relations between the United States and Cuba is going to take a while, and businesses eager to trade with the island nation best be patient, officials say.

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