HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Lara Chelian, center, and her mother, Renee Chelian, both abortion providers from Michigan, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside on March 2, 2016. The case is focused on the Texas law known as House Bill 2.
Lara Chelian, center, and her mother, Renee Chelian, both abortion providers from Michigan, hold signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., as Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt is argued inside on March 2, 2016. The case is focused on the Texas law known as House Bill 2.

Sharp Drop In Abortions Followed Restrictions

The number of drug-induced abortions in Texas plummeted in the first full year after the state's strict 2013 abortion law took effect, according to statistics released Thursday by the Texas Department of State Health Services. The overall number of Texas abortions — which also includes surgical abortions performed in the state and on Texas women out of state — dropped significantly, the agency found.

Demonstrators celebrated at the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, after the court struck down a Texas law imposing strict abortion regulations.
Demonstrators celebrated at the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, after the court struck down a Texas law imposing strict abortion regulations.

Abortion Legal Fight Cost Texas More Than $1 Million

The legal battle to defend Texas' 2013 abortion restrictions — which the U.S. Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional on Monday — cost Texas taxpayers more than $1 million, according to records obtained by The Texas Tribune.

Abortion Legal Fight Cost Texas More Than $1 Million

Demonstrators celebrated at the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, after the court struck down a Texas law imposing strict abortion regulations.
Demonstrators celebrated at the U.S. Supreme Court on June 27, 2016, after the court struck down a Texas law imposing strict abortion regulations.

The legal battle to defend Texas' 2013 abortion restrictions — which the U.S. Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional on Monday — cost Texas taxpayers more than $1 million, according to records obtained by The Texas Tribune.

Vindication For Wendy Davis and "Unruly Mob"

Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, during her filibuster of an abortion bill on June 25, 2013.
Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, during her filibuster of an abortion bill on June 25, 2013.

Almost three years to the day after Wendy Davis held the Texas Senate floor in a filibuster against abortion restrictions that galvanized reproductive rights activists, vindication came Monday in the form of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

Don't Expect Shuttered Texas Abortion Clinics to Reopen Soon

A hallway at the Whole Woman's Health clinic in Austin. The clinic, one of 22 remaining abortion providers in the state, does not currently meet requirements that will take effect on Sept. 1.
A hallway at the Whole Woman's Health clinic in Austin. The clinic, one of 22 remaining abortion providers in the state, does not currently meet requirements that will take effect on Sept. 1.

Though the U.S. Supreme Court overturned provisions in a Texas law that led to the shuttering of more than a dozen abortion clinics, providers say reopening those clinics will take time. 

Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters.
Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters.

Every year, more than 100 new OB-GYNs graduate from a Texas residency program. But the closure of abortion clinics across Texas — more than 20 since 2013 — has made their training increasingly difficult.

Analysis: What the Numbers in the Texas Budget Really Mean

Lauretta Jackson, a physical therapist from Any Baby Can, works with Sara weekly to improve her body strength. Nonprofit therapy providers are worried budget cuts made by lawmakers will put them out of business.
Lauretta Jackson, a physical therapist from Any Baby Can, works with Sara weekly to improve her body strength. Nonprofit therapy providers are worried budget cuts made by lawmakers will put them out of business.

Numbers can give you a full accounting of something without telling you what’s really going on, like when lawmakers talk about trimming budgets and saving money while diverting attention from whatever fell on the cutting room floor.

The Meadows Foundation, RGK Foundation and Burdine Johnson Foundation have supported health care coverage at The Texas Tribune.

Source: Delayed Texas Abortion Data Finished Months Ago

Lauren Baker (right) of Plano and Mary Baumgard of Minnesota held signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court March 2, 2016, as the court arguments in a case on a Texas abortion law.
Lauren Baker (right) of Plano and Mary Baumgard of Minnesota held signs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court March 2, 2016, as the court arguments in a case on a Texas abortion law.

The process of compiling much-anticipated Texas abortion statistics for 2014 — expected to reflect the impact of House Bill 2 abortion restrictions — followed its normal course up until February of this year, a health agency insider says. Then things stalled.

More Texas Women Opting for Drug-Induced Abortions, Providers Say

First approved by the FDA in 2000, mifepristone, when taken with another drug called misoprostol, is used to terminate early pregnancies.
First approved by the FDA in 2000, mifepristone, when taken with another drug called misoprostol, is used to terminate early pregnancies.

Texas abortion providers say the percentage of women at their clinics opting for drug-induced abortions to terminate early pregnancies has climbed significantly since March — when the FDA updated its rules for the medication.